polyhistor


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polyhistor

(pŏl″ē-hĭs′tŭr) [″ + histor, learned]
A scholar or physician who has great and varied abilities and knowledge (e.g., Hippocrates, Galen, Paracelsus, Leonardo da Vinci, Boerhaave, Sir William Osler, Richard Mead, and Thomas Jefferson).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Freudenthal, Hellenistische Studien--Alexander Polyhistor (Breslau: Verlag von H.
Chapter 3, "Patriarchal Fictions," opens with the three fragments from Artapanus's "On the Jews" preserved by Alexander Polyhistor. Moving quickly over the shorter accounts of Abraham and Joseph, Johnson shows how in retelling the story of Moses, Artapanus sought to "create a new and paradoxical Exodus narrative to suit the particular needs of his Egyptian Jewish audience" (96-97), a group that, although they celebrated the Passover, had no desire to leave their adopted country.
In keeping with this text-based approach, a significant part of the book consists of Annexes reproducing in full some of the most important items: Claude Mignault, 'Syntagma de Symbolis' (1602); Giovanni Nesi, Oraculum de nouo saeculo (1497); Filippo Beroaldo, Symbola pythagorae moraliter explicata (1502); Lilio Gregori Giraldi, Libelli duo (1551); Agostino Steuco, De perenni philosophia (1591); Nicolas Caussin, Electorum symbolorum et polyhistor symbolicus (1618); Maximilian van der Sandt, Theologia Symbolica (1626); Jacob Masen, Speculum imaginum veritatis occultae (1681).
Becher was a polyhistor, Leibniz recognized that, even though he appeared critical of the good doctor's many-sided interests.
The legend was abstracted by Eusebius from Polyhistor's On the Jews, a work that included stories from Eupolemus.
The artist as polyhistor; "The intellectual superstructure", in the work of Per Kirkeby.
Alsted (1588-1638) was a Calvinist polyhistor, encyclopedist, philosopher, and theologian who spent most of his life at the academy of Herborn, in the small county of Nassau-Dillenburg, "in the half-century after its foundation in 1584 one of the most innovative and influential Calvinist academies in Europe" (6), first as a student and later as a respected professor of philosophy and theology.
Jacobson, The Exagoge of Ezekiel (1983), 5, points to the fact that many of the witnesses quoted by Eusebius (including the three poets) are cited indirectly via the work of Alexander Polyhistor. Jacobson claims that Eusebius introduces only Alexander Polyhistor as a pagan and is unconcerned with the origin of the writers cited by the latter.
126 So (as Diogenes Laertius would also later report), there were points (not to be confused with Democritean atoms), and points became lines, and lines became plane figures, plane figures became solids, and these became perceivable bodies, a theory of which Ficino was certainly aware; see Diogenes Laertius 8.25 (citing Alexander Polyhistor) (=DK 58B1a); passage cited in McKirahan, 101.