polyglucosan

polyglucosan

[-glo̅o̅′kəsan]
Etymology: Gk, polys + glykys, sweet
a large molecule consisting of many anhydrous polysaccharides.

polyglucosan

(pŏl″ē-gloo′kŏ-săn″)
Glucose polymers. Abnormal collections of glucose polymers in tissue specimens are sometimes called “polyglucosan bodies, ” “Lafora bodies, ” or “corpora amylacea.”
References in periodicals archive ?
Diagnosis is made by identification of Lafora bodies, which are polyglucosan inclusion bodies.
Progressive myoclonus epilepsy with polyglucosan bodies: Lafora disease.
Corpora amylacea and the family of polyglucosan diseases.
The carbohydrate binding domain of Lafora disease protein targets Lafora polyglucosan bodies.
Surprises of genetic engineering: a possible model of polyglucosan body (Lafora) disease.
A distinct form of adult polyglucosan body disease with massive involvement of central and peripheral neuronal processes and astrocytes: a report of four cases anda review of the occurrence of polyglucosan bodies in other conditions such a Lafora's disease and normal ageing.
Adult polyglucosan body disease is a chronically progressive neurological disease first described in 1980.
Adult polyglucosan body disease is a clinicopathologic entity typically presenting in the fifth to seventh decades with peripheral neuropathy, upper motor neuron signs, neurogenic bladder, and dementia.
Polyglucosan bodies are the pathologic hallmark of this disease.
Busard and coworkers[4] investigated the value of an axillary skin biopsy for the diagnosis of adult polyglucosan body disease in a 65-year-old woman in whom the diagnosis had been established by sural nerve biopsy.
Typical polyglucosan bodies are present in the sweat gland lumina in Lafora's disease.
Monoclonal antibody against polyglucosan isolated from myocardium of a patient with Lafora disease.