polygenic


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polygenic

 [pol″e-jēn´ik]
pertaining to or determined by several different genes.

pol·y·gen·ic

(pol'ē-jen'ik),
Relating to a hereditary disease or normal characteristic controlled by the added effects of genes at multiple loci.

polygenic

(pŏl′ē-jĕn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or determined by polygenes: polygenic inheritance.
2.
a. Of or relating to polygenesis; polygenetic.
b. Of or relating to polygenism.

pol′y·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

pol·y·gen·ic

(pol'ē-jen'ik)
Relating to a hereditary disease or normal characteristic controlled by the added effects of genes at multiple loci.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polygenic scores for DMA% were not significantly associated with skin lesion status when using p-value thresholds of p < [10.sup.-4], p < [10.sup.-3], and p < 0.01 (unless including AS3MT SNPs when using a threshold of < [10.sup.-4]); however, polygenic scores for DMA% were associated with skin lesion status when p-value thresholds of < 0.1, < 0.3, and < 0.5 were used to construct the score (Table 3).
[30,31] Although this approach had proven extremely successful in identifying rare genetic variants of strong effects for single-gene disorders such as maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY)[32], but proved limited in unveiling common genetic variants that underlie polygenic diseases.
It includes both polygenic origin and undefined environmental factors that will increase the variation in incidence both geographically and to some extend racially.
Some articles have described negative shifts in mean values for polygenic traits following mutagenic treatments in [M.sub.2] and [M.sub.3] generations (Muduli & Misra, 2008), whereas, many others reported positive shifts in the mean values of polygenic traits in [M.sub.2] and [M.sub.3] generations (Khan & Wani, 2006; Khan et al., 2004).
In addition, there is broad evidence that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations may cause neurological and metabolic disease in children and adults that produce recognized phenotypes and whose characteristics are transmitted as features of polygenic complexes (5), such as in autism.
non-diabetogenic obesity syndrome in two new mouse models of polygenic obesity.
Both disorders are believed to have polygenic influences.
Researchers also verified that resistance to the pathogen in this population has polygenic inheritance, is conditioned by both additive and dominance genetic effects, and that genotypes with high resistance were rare in the germplasm at that time.
There is developing interest in polygenic low-penetrant genes that may be influenced by environmental factors, although the actual contribution of such genes to breast cancer pathogenesis remains elusive.
Let L be the QTL under test and [g.sub.i] be the sum of additive effects of the alleles carried by line i at all other QTL (q = 2, ..., w), or "polygenic effect." Then the statistical model can be simplified to
It seems highly likely that schizophrenia is polygenic. The clinical disorder is the result of several genes, each tied to a specific deficit, operating together.
The etiology of cancer probably is polygenic, the result of the interaction of several genes, and multifactorial, resulting from the interaction of many genetic and environmental factors (Chompret, 2003; Hemminki, 2001; Hillebrandt, Matern, & Lammert, 2003; Li, 2002; Links, van Tol, Meerman, & de Vries, 2001; Lynch, Deters, Lynch, & Brand, 2002; Risch, 2001).