polygene


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polygene

 [pol´e-jēn]
a group of nonallelic genes that interact to influence the same character with additive effect.

pol·y·gene

(pol'ē-jēn),
One of many genes that contribute to the phenotypic value of a measurable phenotype.

polygene

/poly·gene/ (pol´e-jēn) a group of nonallelic genes that interact to influence the same character with additive effect.

polygene

(pŏl′ē-jēn′)
n.
Any of a group of nonallelic genes, each having a small quantitative effect, that together produce a wide range of phenotypic variation. Also called multiple factor.

polygene

[pol′ējēn′]
Etymology: Gk, polys + genein, to produce
any of a group of nonallelic genes that individually exert a small effect but interact in a cumulative manner to produce a particular characteristic, usually of a quantitative nature, such as size, weight, skin pigmentation, or degree of intelligence. Also called cumulative gene, multiple factor, multiple gene. See also multifactorial inheritance. polygenic, adj.

pol·y·gene

(pol'ē-jēn)
One of many genes that contribute to the phenotypic value of a measurable phenotype.

polygene

a group of nonallelic genes that interact to influence the same character with additive effect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Statistical approach: Individual genetic effects due to major genes and commutative effects due to polygene for grain filling duration were determined by using joint segregation analysis (JSA) or mixed inheritance model with five different groups of 24 genetic models (Tables 3 4 with certain assumptions of Wang (1996) Gai and Wang (1998) Gai et al.
Estimating effects of a single gene and polygenes on quantitative traits from diallel design.
Using variance components for polygenes and major genes, following Janss (2008), the heritabilities and repeatabilities were calculated as:
Diallel analysis showed that genotype differences on Si content in rice were controlled by polygenes (Majumder et al.
Spontaneous mutation rates of polygenes controlling viability.
Generally seed yield is a quantitative trait which is governed by polygenes in bean (Arunga et al.
In addition to these genes, polygenes, which function together to control a quantitatively expressed resistance, have been located on several chromosomes in the A, B, and D genomes (Nicholson et al.
66 for the quadratic b2 term, indicating that a major gene was not segregating for the families evaluated in this study and that environmental factors and other polygenes could contribute to the differences between families.
Chang and Yen (1969) and Chang and Tagumpay (1973) concluded that the seed dormancy is a quantitative trait governed by polygenes with cumulative but unequal effects and is strongly affected by environmental conditions during seed development.