polyethylene glycol


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to polyethylene glycol: propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 400

polyethylene

 [pol″e-eth´ĭ-lēn]
polymerized ethylene, (—CH2—CH2—)n, a synthetic plastic material, forms of which have been used in reparative surgery.
polyethylene glycol a polymer of ethylene oxide and water, available in liquid form (polyethylene glycol 300 or 400) or as waxy solids (polyethylene glycol 1540 or 4000), used in various pharmaceutical preparations as a water-soluble ointment base. Polyethylene glycol is also used as a laxative.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

polyethylene glycol

n.
Any of a family of high molecular weight liquids and waxes that are condensation polymers of ethylene glycol, are soluble in water and in many organic solvents, and are used in detergents, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals and as emulsifiers, lubricants, and plasticizers.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

polyethylene glycol

A substance used with other ingredients to be used as a laxative. Brand names are Klean-prep and Movicol.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(D), net C[O.sub.2] assimilation rate (E), leaf Fe (F) and Mn concentrations (G), and leaf (H) and root (I) starch concentrations of 'Valencia' sweet orange (VO) grafted onto 'Rangpur' lime (RL) and 'Swingle' citrumelo (SC) rootstocks in pots, and irrigated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) at -376 kPa from 15 to 120 days after grafting.
Ono et al., "Prospective controlled study on the effects of polyethylene glycol in capsule endoscopy," World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
Staron et al., "High-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol protects cardiac myocytes from hypoxia- and reoxygenation-induced cell death and preserves ventricular function," American Journal of Physiology--Heart and Circulatory Physiology, vol.
However, the association of cinnamon EO with the coadjuvants tested, EDTA and polyethylene glycol, didn't have a statistically significant reducing effect for aerobic mesophiles and for yeasts and molds.
Hesperidin (purity 97%) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 and other chemical were of analytical grade and purchased from Aladdin Reagent Co.
They then looked at the effects on the mice of eating green tea extract alone, and eating green tea extract plus polyethylene glycol. They compared these against the effects of two other therapeutic drugs routinely prescribed for type 2 diabetes.
The use of nonionic, water-soluble polymers, in particular polyethylene glycol (PEG), for fractional precipitation of proteins was introduced in 1964 by Poison et al.
Key words: Sorghum bicolor L., Polyethylene glycol (PEG), water stress, seedling traits.
Doctors who performed colonoscopies on 116 patients reported that the images inside the colon were of the same clarity whether the patients had taken two doses or just one dose of polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution, a purgative which removes fecal matter from the colon.
Dulcolax Balance contains polyethylene glycol (PFG) 3350, which the company says is the most clinically proven laxative ingredient.
Comparison of polyethylene glycol 3350 and lactulose for treatment of chronic constipation in children.

Full browser ?