polyene


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polyene

 [pol´e-ēn]
1. a chemical compound with a carbon chain of four or more atoms and several conjugated double bonds.
2. any of a group of antibiotic antifungal agents with similar structure, such as amphotericin b, candicidin, or nystatin; they are produced by species of Streptomyces that damage cell membranes by forming complexes with sterols.

pol·y·ene

(pol'ē-ēn),
A chemical compound having a series of conjugated (alternating) double bonds; for example, the carotenoids.

polyene

/pol·y·ene/ (pol´e-ēn)
1. a chemical compound with a carbon chain of four or more atoms and several conjugated double bonds.
2. any of a group of antifungal antibiotics with such a structure (e.g., amphotericin and nystatin) produced by species of Streptomyces that damage cell membranes by forming complexes with sterols.

polyene

1 a chemical compound with a carbon chain of four or more atoms and several conjugated double bonds.
2 any of a group of antibiotic, antifungal agents with similar structure, such as Amphotericin B or Nystatin; they are produced by a species of Streptomyces that damage cell membranes by forming complexes with sterols.

polyene

chemical compound characterized by the presence of several conjugated double bonds.

polyene antibiotics
a group of agents, synthesized by Streptomyces spp., with antifungal activity; includes amphotericin B, nystatin and candicidin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding the PK of polyenes, the concentration-time profile of amphotericin is nonlinear but there are important differences between [AMB.
In a paper published in 2014 in the journal Nature Chemistry, Burke showed that most of the motifs of a class of compounds called polyenes could be made from just 12 basic building blocks by repeating a simple chemical reaction.
Hence, the polyenes prefer twisted conformations to avoid accumulation of substituent.
1]) is an antibiotic of the polyene group extracted from Streptomyces nursei microorganism cultures.
The drugs of choice for the treatment of fungal infections are primarily polyene and azole classes of compounds which have been found to be nephrotoxic and less effective in invasive mycotic infection.
The PVDF degradation processes implies the formation of different species, such as HF, with the destruction of the original polymer structure and the formation of a conjugated system, crosslinking, branching, and polyene formation, increasing degradation at temperatures ranging 400-600[degrees]C results in the aromatization and ultimately polyaromatization [45-47].
The antimycotic drugs available for the treatment of systemic fungal infections are limited (11 active compounds) and may be divided into four classes: (i) polyene macrolides; (ii) azole derivatives; (iii) DNA and RNA inhibitors; and (iv) 1,3-[beta]-glucan synthase inhibitors (echinocandins) (FERA et al.
The conjugated polyene chromophore determines not only the light absorption properties, and hence color, but also the chemical reactivity of carotenoids toward oxidizing agents and free radical, and hence for any antioxidant role.
The polyene antibiotics, which apparently act by binding to membrane sterols, contain a rigid hydrophobic center and a flexible hydrophilic section.