polyembryony


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Related to polyembryony: apomixis

pol·y·em·bry·o·ny

(pol'ē-em-brē'ō-nē),
Condition of a zygote's giving rise to two or more embryos.
[poly- + G. embryon, embryo]

polyembryony

(pŏl′ē-ĕm′brē-ə-nē, -ĕm-brī′-)
n.
Development of more than one embryo from a single egg or ovule.

pol′y·em′bry·on′ic (-brē-ŏn′ĭk) adj.

polyembryony

  1. (in plants) the formation of more than one embryo within the TESTA of a seed.
  2. (in animals) the development of more than one embryo from a single egg as occurs, for example, in certain parasitic HYMENOPTERA which use this phenomenon to increase rapidly the numbers of juveniles within the host.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Polyembryony is the splitting of a single product of sexual reproduction (zygote, embryo, or larva) into multiple offspring with identical genotypes.
He described clearly the phenomenon of polyembryony in seed plants (Brown, 1844).
All germinated seeds were checked for the presence of more than one embryo per seed, known as polyembryony and common in Bombacoideae (Mendes-Rodrigues et al.
Even though more than one egg may be fertilized and more than one embryo may start to develop, a process known as polyembryony, all but one generally aborts, and a single embryo develops to maturity within each seed.
Nine-banded armadillos exhibit obligate polyembryony, whereby they produce litters of genetically identical quadruplets by repeated twinning of a single fertilized egg.
Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) has been used in the identification of lemon mutants (Deng et al., 1995), chimeras (Sugarawa and Oowada, 1995), somatic hybrids (Guo et al., 2000) and polyembryony (Ramalho et al., 2000; Andrade-Rodriguez et al., 2004).
(10) A condition known as polyembryony where the embryos possess separate amniotic sacs but are enclosed within a common chorion, see W.J.
Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) and other members of this genus are the only vertebrates that routinely exhibit monozygotic polyembryony or giving birth to genetically identical offspring (Newman and Patterson, 1910; Newman, 1913; Prodohl et al., 1996), and thus are of interest to behavioral ecologists because of their potential use as a model for kin-biased behavior (Hamilton, 1964; Dawkins, 1976; Loughry et al., 1998).
Gynodioecy, polyembryony, and partial asexuality (vegetative reproduction) have all been suggested as candidate systems that could potentially have this effect (Lande et al.
The development of the nine-banded armadillo from the primitive streak stage to birth: with especial reference to the question of specific polyembryony. J.