polydactyly


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Related to polydactyly: syndactyly

polydactyly

 [pol″e-dak´tĭ-le]
the presence of more than the usual number of fingers or toes; called also hyperdactyly and polydactylism.

pol·y·dac·ty·ly

(pol'ē-dak'ti-lē), [MIM*603596]
Presence of more than five digits on hand or foot.
Synonym(s): polydactylism
[poly- + G. daktylos, finger]

polydactyly

Bunches of fingers

pol·y·dac·ty·ly

(pol'ē-dak'ti-lē)
Presence of more than five fingers or toes on hand or foot.
[poly- + G. daktylos, finger]

polydactyly

The possession of more than the normal number of fingers or toes.

pol·y·dac·ty·ly

(pol'ē-dak'ti-lē) [MIM*603596]
Presence of more than five digits on hand or foot.
[poly- + G. daktylos, finger]
References in periodicals archive ?
A new locus for postaxial polydactyly type A/B on chromosome 7q21-q34.
Bifid epiglottis and polydactyly: A new genetic syndrome.
Associated anomalies in individuals with polydactyly. Am J Med Genet 1998; 80(5):459-65.
The Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder, mainly characterized by short height, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and congenital cardiac defects.
Clinical symptoms manifested in the proband, including short humerus, postaxial polydactyly and heart malformation overlap with the characteristics of EvC syndrome.
The digital manifestations are brachydactyly, polydactyly, syndactyly, clinodactyly and duplicated hallux.
"Six Toe" has a condition called polydactyly, which means he has an extra digit on each foot and hand.
Polydactyly - the presence of supernumerary fingers - is a phenomenon that has already been observed in various land animals in Devon and is also fairly common in humans, dogs and cats.
Postaxial polydactyly affects one in 500 babies but their extra digits are only skin.
Comparing 37,154 cases of any of the 14 malformations with 39,472 controls with other types of major malformations and 11,763 controls with malformations associated with chromosomal abnormalities, first-trimester exposure to valproic acid was associated with an increased risk of 6 of the 14 malformations, compared with the two control groups: spina bifida (adjusted odds ratio 12.7), atrial septal defect (2.5), cleft palate (5.2), hypospadias (4.8), Polydactyly (2.2), and craniosynostosis (6.8).
The malformations that occurred in infants who were exposed to sumatriptan in the first trimester included abnormal head circumference, single palmar crease, and systolic murmur; moderate craniosynostosis; cerebral abnormality with developmental delay; partial cleft lip; ventricular septal defects (4); biliary atresia; diaphragmatic hernia; pyloric stenosis (3); anterior displacement of anus; hip dysplasia; polydactyly; malformation of left hand; and Down syndrome (3).