polycentric


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pol·y·cen·tric

(pol'ē-sen'trik),
Having several centers.

polycentric

/poly·cen·tric/ (-sen´trik) having many centers.

polycentric

(pŏl′ē-sĕn′trĭk)
adj.
Having several central parts, as a chromosome with multiple centromeres.
n.
A polycentric chromosome.

pol′y·cen′trism n.

polycentric

(pŏl″ē-sĕn′trĭk) [″ + kentron, center]
The condition of having many centers.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Polycentric Governance has been described as a regulatory system "characterized by multiple governing authorities at differing scales rather than a monocentric unit.
One of the unique features of a competitive, contractual, polycentric legal order is that the role it assigns to hard legal institutions is merely to make the enforcement of rules based on the underlying soft legal institutions more effective.
For example, a solution mapping mechanism is urgently needed to help stakeholders-especially in developing countries-find their way through a distributed Internet governance ecosystem, while polycentric solution formulation will help address the growing number of issues ranging from cyber-security to user privacy.
Germany's polycentric history also explains why today all 16 states have sovereignty over their own cultural affairs -- and they include the three city-states of Hamburg, Bremen and Berlin.
The world today is getting polycentric and multipolar," Lavrov said.
It also allows us to think about power and the risks of a monocentric society, as opposed to a polycentric one.
As leaders of the strongest economies of the five countries in the BRICS group, Presidents Vladimir Putin of Russia and Xi Jinping of China signed hundreds of agreements for billions of dollars with Latin America's progressive governments with which they either have, or are looking for, points of agreements on the necessity of modifying structures of the global agencies and establishing a fair and polycentric new world order based on international law with the UN playing a central coordinating role.
This is not a book of urban theory, but rather an on-the-ground view of how Toronto developed from a small colonial outpost in the 1800s to a bustling, multicultural, polycentric city-region in the 21st century.
Conversely, consumers, who may choose to either ignore COO information in their product choices and/or exhibit preferences for imported products/services, can be characterized as polycentric in their purchase orientation.
While Infernal Affairs represents Hong Kong as a polycentric Non-City in its discourse on political polycentrism and moral ambiguity that characterize post-colonial Hong Kong society, The Departed depicts Boston as a paradigmatic Crime City, where laws of hierarchy and retribution prevail in a social structure that is dichotomized, in the sense that the society is understood in terms of good and evil, justice and punishment, right and wrong.
Another of the authors' concerns is the difficulty of developing a real service culture in an environment that is more grounded in "19th century hierarchical models of parliamentary governance [than] the kind of 21st century polycentric, collaborative and open boundary approaches to service delivery that are emerging in many developed polities" (p.