pollution

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pollution

 [pah-loo´shun]
defiling or making impure, especially contamination by noxious substances.

pol·lu·tion

(pŏ-lū'shŭn),
Rendering unclean or unsuitable by contact or mixture with an undesired contaminant.
[L. pollutio, fr. pol-luo, pp. -lutus, to defile]

pollution

(pə-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of polluting or the state of being polluted, especially the contamination of soil, water, or the atmosphere by the discharge of harmful substances.
2. Something that pollutes; a pollutant or a group of pollutants: Pollution in the air reduced the visibility near the airport.

pol·lu·tion

(pŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. That which pollutes (i.e., makes unclean, impure, or unsuitable by contact or mixture with an undesirable contaminant); a pollutant.
2. The condition of being polluted (i.e., contaminated).
[L. pollutio, fr. pol-luo, pp. -lutus, to defile]

pollution

the contamination of an environment by any substance or energy. Heavy metals, oil, sewage, noise, heat, radiation and pesticides are common pollutants which can affect the environment adversely.

pollution

defiling or making impure, especially contamination by noxious substances. See also environmental pollution.

anesthetic pollution
escape of inhalant anesthetic agents into the surgery environment has been linked to cases of spontaneous abortion, birth defects, cancer, liver disease, loss of cognitive and motor skills and drug dependence in operating room personnel. See also anesthetic scavenging.

Patient discussion about pollution

Q. where would i find list of all the "clean" cities and the rates of air pollution ...?

A. i don't know about a list of "good" cities, but i know a list of the worse cities for Asthmatic people!-
http://www.webmd.com/asthma/news/20050215/americas-worst-asthma-cities

More discussions about pollution
References in periodicals archive ?
If the twentieth-century water pollution reformers failed to pick up on the broader issues of occupational health in the early twentieth century, it was not because they had no history of concern, but rather because the older water reformers were stymied by the interaction between business resistance and the growing influence of the scientific specialists.
See Christopher Sellers, "Factory as Environment: Industrial Hygiene, Professional Collaboration and Modern Sciences of Pollution," Environmental History Review 18, Spring, 1994, 57, 59, 60; Joel Tarr, "Industrial Wastes and Public Health: Some Historical Notes, Part 1, 1876-1932," American Journal of Public Health 75, 1985, 1059-1067; James Cassedy, Charles V.
Sellers notes that water pollution activists' focus on purely bateriological concerns meant that it was "the industrial hygienists rather than water pollution experts [that] played [the] pioneering role [of developing a toxicological approach to pollution].
In 1882 Connecticut passed a bill to study pollution of streams.
This report was submitted as a special report by Charles Folsom, entitled "The Pollution of Streams.
Both contributed to water pollution and a decline in dissolved oxygen.
For a discussion of the development of the Public Health movement's concern over pollution see Joel Tarr, "Industrial Wastes and Public Health," 1059-1068.
Town of Newton, Lemon argued that pollution dumped into a brook which flowed through his property rendered it "unhealthy by stenches coming from the brook.
Increasingly individuals and towns were going to court arguing that pollution was a public nuisance.
The English had first recognized stream pollution by mid-century with the growth of common law and suits for damages.
In 1872 the legislature directed the board to investigate pollution of Miller's river, and 1875 the legislature directed the board to investigate river and stream pollution.