pollution

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pollution

 [pah-loo´shun]
defiling or making impure, especially contamination by noxious substances.

pol·lu·tion

(pŏ-lū'shŭn),
Rendering unclean or unsuitable by contact or mixture with an undesired contaminant.
[L. pollutio, fr. pol-luo, pp. -lutus, to defile]

pollution

(pə-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of polluting or the state of being polluted, especially the contamination of soil, water, or the atmosphere by the discharge of harmful substances.
2. Something that pollutes; a pollutant or a group of pollutants: Pollution in the air reduced the visibility near the airport.

pol·lu·tion

(pŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. That which pollutes (i.e., makes unclean, impure, or unsuitable by contact or mixture with an undesirable contaminant); a pollutant.
2. The condition of being polluted (i.e., contaminated).
[L. pollutio, fr. pol-luo, pp. -lutus, to defile]

pollution

the contamination of an environment by any substance or energy. Heavy metals, oil, sewage, noise, heat, radiation and pesticides are common pollutants which can affect the environment adversely.

pollution

defiling or making impure, especially contamination by noxious substances. See also environmental pollution.

anesthetic pollution
escape of inhalant anesthetic agents into the surgery environment has been linked to cases of spontaneous abortion, birth defects, cancer, liver disease, loss of cognitive and motor skills and drug dependence in operating room personnel. See also anesthetic scavenging.

Patient discussion about pollution

Q. where would i find list of all the "clean" cities and the rates of air pollution ...?

A. i don't know about a list of "good" cities, but i know a list of the worse cities for Asthmatic people!-
http://www.webmd.com/asthma/news/20050215/americas-worst-asthma-cities

More discussions about pollution
References in periodicals archive ?
Industrial wastes, it was argued, helped reduce sewage pollution by killing germs.
59) Science and technology did offer solutions to the problems of nineteenth-century pollution.
For the reformers of the 1870s and 1880s, the science of observation linked industrial and sewage pollution (both clearly observable) to concerns for public health.
The industrialists argued convincingly that forcing them to stop polluting would harm the economic welfare of the state, while the public health reformers argued just as convincingly that not to clean up the pollution would harm public health.
68) Yet just as these reformers were going into full battle against pollution, the main justification for their attack, their environmental theory of disease causation, was undermined by the new germ theory of disease, and their position as scientific experts was being challenged by the new scientific specialists.
The old reformers were scientific generalists, usually medical doctors and statisticians, who understood pollution as something that could be seen, smelled, or tasted, dirty, blackened bad smelling air or water, without fish.
How the germ theory and public policy united was also tied up in the nature of the public struggle that emerged over the issue of pollution reform.
71) Industrial pollution did not disappear from the discourse of health reform because of the germ theory.
In New England manufacturers were able to resist pollution reform, but they were initially not able to defeat or silence the reformers who put forward an argument for the public good of clean water linked to public health to checkmate the manufacturers' argument of the good of economic development.
If the twentieth-century water pollution reformers failed to pick up on the broader issues of occupational health in the early twentieth century, it was not because they had no history of concern, but rather because the older water reformers were stymied by the interaction between business resistance and the growing influence of the scientific specialists.
See Christopher Sellers, "Factory as Environment: Industrial Hygiene, Professional Collaboration and Modern Sciences of Pollution," Environmental History Review 18, Spring, 1994, 57, 59, 60; Joel Tarr, "Industrial Wastes and Public Health: Some Historical Notes, Part 1, 1876-1932," American Journal of Public Health 75, 1985, 1059-1067; James Cassedy, Charles V.