poll

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poll

(pōl),
The anatomic landmark in equids at junction between head and neck on dorsal top line between the ears. Area is subject to trauma. Historically, condition called p. evil was prevalent, a disorder arising from Brucella sp. infection of supraatlantal bursa; now rarely seen.
[M.E., fr. D. pol, head]

poll

(pōl)
n.
The head, especially the top of the head where hair grows.
v. polled, polling, polls
v.tr.
1. To cut off or trim (hair, horns, or wool, for example); clip.
2. To trim or cut off the hair, wool, branches, or horns of: polled the sheep; polled the trees.

poll′er n.

POLL  

Physician Office-to-lab link Lab medicine A system consisting of soft and hardware that links a physician's office computer to a diagnostic lab, so the results are transferred to the office when available in the lab
References in periodicals archive ?
Several polls showed that the turnout of religious conservatives in Ohio ticked upward because of a state ballot referendum to ban same-sex marriage.
"When some of our members have gone to early voting or to register to vote, they're being asked if they're citizens of the United States." Gonzalez says she has heard from "about half a dozen people, all of them in South Florida," who approached the polls as part of the early election only to be asked their citizenship.
"If the poll just interviews people who volunteer for the poll, like most Web polls, ignore it," says Warren Mitofsky, a polling expert who has influenced the field for decades.
And poll after poll show the two candidates oscillating within a few percentage points of one another.
Given these conditions, Eisinger concludes that "with the advent of polls, presidents have found the political instrument that provides them with autonomy, accuracy, and power" (p.
Even worse, professional pollsters are adept at producing virtually any conclusion they want via clever wording of questions, arbitrary selection of those polled, or out-and-out lying.
One poll asked readers if they would invest in the paper industry and if so where.
He has a narrower thesis to defend: that polls designed to ask voters if they want more government spending on any given item don't generate politically useful information.
In many cases, poll workers who refused to allow voters to cast their ballot declined to make any effort to verify their registration status, telling them instead to "come back later." Some poll workers attempted to get approval for the voters to cast their ballots but were denied by "headquarters."
With so many polls, at least reporters can compare and contrast, and "discern a middle ground," Gilbert says.
Besen says if more polls were to replicate the finding that friends and relatives of gays are no more likely than others to support gay rights laws, "then we would have to take a hard look at it.