polishing

(redirected from polishings)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

polishing

 [pol´ish-ing]
creation of a smooth and glossy finish on a surface, as of a tooth or denture.

pol·ish·ing

(pol'ish-ing),
In dentistry, the act or process of making a restoration smooth and glossy.

pol·ish·ing

(pol'ish-ing)
In dentistry, the act or process of making a restoration smooth and glossy.

polishing 

The final stage in the surfacing process in which the lens is made smooth and provides regular (instead of random) transmission and specular (instead of diffuse) reflection. It is accomplished by rubbing the lens to and fro over a tool covered with felt cloth or plastic sheet or with pitch (which produces the best results) sprayed with water containing finely powdered cerium oxide or rouge. The curvatures of the lens remain unaltered in this procedure. Polishing of spectacle frames is referred to as buffing or mop polishing or barreling (if the polishing is done using a drum). See cerium oxide; rouge; smoothing; surfacing.

pol·ish·ing

(pol'ish-ing)
1. Cosmetic dental procedure to remove stains from enamel surfaces of teeth, a nonessential cosmetic procedure.
2. Act or process of making a dental restoration smoother and glossy.
Synonym(s): coronal polishing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The clinical relevance of polishing abrasion is directly related to enamel thickness.
The aim of this study was to investigate the realistic abrasive effect of polishing by simulating 75 years of semi-annual, 5 second polishing, and to compare enamel loss with enamel thickness just coronal to the CEJ to ascertain clinical relevance of the abrasion.
A wooden polishing apparatus was made to hold a HygienePro[TM] Air portable prophylaxis polisher (NSK America Corp., Schaumburg, Illinois).
Two blind buccal to lingual width measurements were taken on each tooth before polishing, as well as 2 blind measurements afterwards.
These results suggest that a lifetime of routine polishing within our study's parameters is likely to have a minimal effect, if any, on enamel thickness.
Many previous studies on enamel abrasion from polishing used chemical analysis of I polishing event to calculate enamel loss.
Additionally, the fluoride content of individual teeth may have varied, as well as previous exposure to polishing. Either of these factors could affect abrasion.
Data from this study suggests that less enamel is lost during polishing than was previously indicated by Vrbic et al.
The molar results indicate no significant loss from repetitive polishing, which differs from the premolar results.
Vrbic et al's research demonstrating enamel loss from polishing initiated concern about indiscriminate polishing.
The concern about removing fluoride-rich enamel, coupled with research indicating lack of therapeutic value, prompted professional organizations to question the practice of routine polishing. (34,36-38) An added benefit of selective polishing is improved patient education in home care.
Some dental surfaces can be damaged by polishing. Demineralized white spot lesions abrade 3 times more than normal enamel.