police power


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police power

The constitutional power of the state to abrogate certain individual rights for the common good (e.g., to institutionalise a mentally ill person to prevent harm to self or others).
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References in periodicals archive ?
"There is no single word or syllables in the MMDA law that grants MMDA police power, let alone legislative power.
They claimed that the MMDA 'exceeded its powers' when it issued the regulation 'because it does not possess legislative nor police powers.'
(12) The Court in Dedman allowed the Waterfield test to be used as a mechanism for police power creation.
I commend and recommend that everyone "Support Your Local Police" because, per our constitutions, all lawful police powers are local.
Plessy represented the expansionist view of the police power that Lochner repudiated."
The purpose of this letter is to suggest a new angle toward achieving proactive economic redevelopment through the marketplace via police power rather than the powers of eminent domain alone.
Under our American constitutional structure, the "police power" (the authority of sovereign governments to enact laws and promote regulations that safeguard the health, safety, and welfare of its citizens) is reserved to the states by the 10th Amendment to the U.S.
28 when they tried to deliver a petition protesting abuse of police power.
He explores how the states increased police power, muddled what seem to be obvious current distinctions in sexual acts, stripped the accused of basic constitutional protections, expanded institutional populations, and practiced new treatments such as shock-therapy, psychosurgery, and psychotropic drugs.
Moreover, the court determined that the city did not have the authority to enact the five percent franchise fee under its police power if the fees were "non-cost related." The court held that the city "only possesses those police power which are authorized and delegated to it by the state." The court found that the phrase "the right to exact rentals for the use of its streets" under Tennessee state law did not include the power to tax or raise revenue.
In the selection of materials beginning with an historical account of the roots of police power to a philosophical discourse on police versus citizen rights to the legal and political limitations on the exercise of police power, the authors have skillfully adopted a critical but informative approach that contextualizes the issue of police power.

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