poison sumac


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poison sumac

n.
1. A shrub or small tree (Toxicodendron vernix) of eastern North American wetlands, having compound leaves and greenish-white berries and causing a rash on contact.
2. A skin rash caused by contact with this plant.

poi·son i·vy

, poison oak , poison sumac (poy'zŏn ī'vē, ōk, sūmak)
2. Common name for the cutaneous eruption caused by contact with these species of Toxicodendron.

Patient discussion about poison sumac

Q. is poison ivy or sumac contagious

A. if you scratch the rash and it has open sores,the pus from the sores can spread to other parts of the body and to other people as well,

More discussions about poison sumac
References in periodicals archive ?
Poison ivy is found throughout the U.S., poison oak is mostly found along the Pacific Coast, and poison sumac is found in wet, swampy areas in the eastern U.S.
Poison sumac prefers boggy areas, especially in the south.
The poison sumac Toxicodendron vernix is classified in a different genus (along with poison ivy and poison oak).
Prudently, I refused Chad's request for a piggyback ride to the nearest stand of poison sumac. Lamentably, I failed to take his hand upon jumping the creek.
Those nasty weeds - poison ivy, poison sumac and poison oak - are the single most common cause of allergic reactions in the United States.
Tufts urges a second look at what he calls the "ugly plants." Depending on how tolerant a gardener you are, weeds we usually rip from the ground at first opportunity - even poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac - may merit a spot in your backyard berry patch.
It belongs instead to the cashew family, as do its relatives, poison ivy and poison sumac. Found solely in the West, poison oak grows from southern British Columbia to northern Mexico.
Get acquainted with poison oak and poison sumac, too, however less common they may be in your particular neck of the woods.
The rhus plants include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. In the United States, rhus plants produce many cases of allergic contact dermatitis.
Fall is one of the most dramatic seasons at Volo Bog featuring the gold of tamarack needles, red of poison sumac and the deep green of sphagnum moss.
Poison ivy, along with poison oak and poison sumac, might cause more misery than any other plant in North America; up to three out of every four people are sensitive to it.
Domeboro's unique combination of aluminium sulfate and calcium acetate relives skin irritations due to poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac or insect bites, or rashes caused by soaps, detergents, cosmetics and jewelry.