poison oak


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poison oak

/poi·son oak/ (ōk) Rhus diversiloba or R. toxicodendron.

poison oak

n.
1. Either of two plants, Toxicodendron pubescens, a shrub of the southeast United States, or T. diversilobum, a shrub or vine of western North America, having compound leaves with three lobed or toothed leaflets, and causing a rash on contact.
3. A skin rash caused by contact with one of these plants.

poison oak

any of several species of shrub of the genus Rhus, common in North America. Skin contact results in allergic dermatitis in many people. The characteristics and treatment of the condition are similar to those of poison ivy. See also poison ivy, rhus dermatitis, urushiol.
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Poison oak
Pharmacognosy A plant—Rhus diversilobium (western poison oak) or Rhus diversiloba (eastern poison oak)—that is highly allergenic due to urushiol
Public health A popular term for any allergic reaction or dermatopathy caused by Rhus diversilobium or Rhus diversiloba

poison oak

A type of hypersensitivity dermatitis caused by Rhus diversiloba–western poison oak, and R quercifolia–eastern poison oak. See Poison ivy.

poi·son i·vy

, poison oak , poison sumac (poy'zŏn ī'vē, ōk, sūmak)
2. Common name for the cutaneous eruption caused by contact with these species of Toxicodendron.
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POISON OAK

poison oak

A climbing vine, Toxicodendron diversiloba, closely related to poison ivy and having the same active substances.
See: illustration

poison

a substance that, on ingestion, inhalation, absorption, application, injection or development within the body, in relatively small amounts, may cause structural damage or functional disturbance.
Corrosives are poisons that destroy tissues directly. They include the mineral acids, such as nitric acid, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid, and the caustic alkalis, such as ammonia, sodium hydroxide (lye), sodium carbonate and sodium hypochlorite; and carbolic acid (phenol).
Irritants are poisons that inflame the mucous membranes by direct action. These include copper sulfate, salts of lead, cantharidin, oxalate raphides, and many plant and insect poisons.
Nerve toxins act on the nerves or affect some of the basic cell processes. This large group includes the narcotics, such as opium, heroin and cocaine, and the barbiturates, anesthetics and alcohols.
Blood toxins act on the blood and deprive it of oxygen. They include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrocyanic acid and the gases used in chemical warfare. Some blood toxins destroy the blood cells or the platelets.
See also poisoning and names of individual poisons.

poison bean
sesbania spp., thermopsismontana.
berry poison
gastrolobiumparvifolium.
box poison
gastrolobiumparviflorum.
bullock poison
gastrolobiumtrilobum.
poison bush
thesiumnamaquense.
bushman's poison
poison buttercup
ranunculusscleratus.
camel poison
erythrophleumchlorostachys.
candyup poison
stypandra glauca.
Champion Bay poison
gastrolobiumoxyloboides.
clover-leaf poison
goodialotifolia.
cluster poison
gastrolobiumbennettsianum.
poison Control Center
public facility set up to provide information around the clock to provide information on toxicity of substances and current information of correct first aid methods and antidotes for poisoning emergencies.
crinkle-leaf poison
gastrolobiumvillosum.
desert poison bush
gastrolobiumgrandiflorum.
poison elder
Gilbernene poison
gastrolobiumrotundifolium.
granite poison
gastrolobiumgraniticum.
heart-leaf poison bush
gastrolobiumbilobum or G. grandiflorum.
poison hemlock
Hill River poison
gastrolobiumpolystachyum.
hook-point poison
gastrolobiumhamulosum.
horned poison
gastrolobiumpolystachyum.
Hutt River poison
gastrolobiumpropinquum.
insect poison
poison ivy
toxicodendronradicans.
kite-leaf poison
gastrolobiumlaytonii.
lamb poison
isotropiscuneifolia.
poison leaf
dichapetalumcymosum.
poison lobelia
lobeliapratioides.
mallet poison
gastrolobiumdensifolium.
marlock poison
gastrolobiumparviflorum.
poison morning glory
ipomoeamuelleri.
narrow-leaf poison
gastrolobiumstenophyllum.
net-leaf poison
gastrolobiumracemosum.
poison oak
toxicodendrondiversilobum, T. quercifolium.
poison onion
dipcadiglaucum.
pea-blossom poison
poison peach
trematomentosa. Called also peach-leaf poison bush.
poison pimelea
pimeleapauciflora.
poison pod albizia
albiziaversicolor.
prickly poison
gastrolobiumspinosum.
rigid-leaf poison
gastrolobiumrigidum.
river poison
gastrolobiumforrestii.
river poison tree
excoecariadallachyana.
rock poison
gastrolobiumcallistachys.
Roe's poison
gastrolobiumspectabile.
round-leaf poison
gastrolobiumpycnostachyum.
runner poison
gastrolobiumovalifolium.
poison sage
isotropisatropurpurea.
sandplain poison
gastrolobiummicrocarpum.
scale-leaf poison
gastrolobiumappressum.
poison sedge
schoenusasperocarpus.
slender poison
gastrolobiumheterophyllum.
slender lamb poison
isotropisjuncea.
spike poison
gastrolobiumglaucum.
Stirling Range poison
gastrolobiumvelutinum.
poison suckleya
poison sumac
thick-leaf poison
gastrolobiumcrassifolium.
poison vetch
wallflower poison
gastrolobiumgrandiflorum.
wodjil poison
gastrolobiumfloribundum.
woolly poison
gastrolobiumtomentosum.
York Road poison
gastrolobiumcalycinum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poison oak grows in trees, in bushes, and on the ground.
She simply decided to pull all the poison oak out of the family's yard with her bare hands.
The next morning I woke up itching from another terrible case of poison oak, as oozing blisters popped out all over my body, from my knees to my chest and everywhere in between--and I mean everywhere
It's a moderate, 2-mile round-trip; watch for poison oak.
For poison oak, try adding some French green clay to the mixture.
Poison oak, ivy, and sumac all have a sticky sap that contains urushiol (you-ROO-shee-ol), an oil that usually causes a rash.
The new research is the first to investigate long-term reactions by mast cells to poison oak and sun exposure.
Clinical Repair Cream is ideal for those suffering from dry, itchy skin, while Extra Strength Spray is formulated for use on contagious or hard-to-reach areas, such as rashes from poison oak or ivy.
No roots or bushes with briars will be accepted; harmful plants, like poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac will not be accepted; and, no commercial loads will be accepted.
Her husband saved me, pointing out that I was rubbing in poison oak.
He couldn't see McKinley's car in the thick brush, and the slope was choked with poison oak.
I am very sensitive to poison ivy and poison oak and seem to get it at any time of the year even if I'm very careful.