poikilotherm

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poikilotherm

 [poi´kĭ-lo-therm″]
1. an animal that exhibits poikilothermy; a cold-blooded animal.

poi·ki·lo·therm

(poy'ki-lō-therm),
A poikilothermic animal.

poikilotherm

(poi-kĭl′ə-thûrm′)
n.
An organism, such as a fish or reptile, having a body temperature that varies with the temperature of its surroundings.

poi′ki·lo·ther′mi·a (-thûr′mē-ə), poi′ki·lo·ther′my (-thûr′mē) n.
poi′ki·lo·ther′mic (-mĭk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hibernation: poikilotherms. --Encyclopedia of Life Science, Wiley.
Lindsey, "Body sizes of poikilotherm vertebrates at different latitudes," Evolution, vol.
Fry (1967) mentioned that lethal temperatures are important for the physiologic analysis of poikilotherm organisms because it provides a detailed pattern of responses that can be used as an immediate ecological index, since the animals can find lethal temperatures in the habitat as well as thermal fluctuations overcoming their tolerance limits.
All amphibians are poikilotherms, that is, they are totally dependent upon their environment to regulate body temperature and metabolic activity.
With regard to fish, one would not expect that metabolic body size as predicted by Kleiber's (1932) formula would apply because fish muscles are not working against gravity and because fish are poikilotherms. Brett (1973) reports that the maintenance energy requirement of fish is 5% to 10% that of other livestock of similar size in a thermoneutral environment.
Food web magnification of persistent organic pollutants in poikilotherms and homeotherms from the Barents Sea, Environ.
Plants are poikilotherms and most do not produce sufficient heat to raise the temperature of bulk tissue.
Temperature-induced shift in foraging ability in two fish species, roach (Rutilus rutilus) and perch (Perca fluviatilis): implications for coexistence between poikilotherms. Journal of Animal Ecology 55:829-839.
Today, the three main groups of amphibians--salamanders, frogs, and toads--are found worldwide but, as is true of other poikilotherms (animals with variable body temperature), the majority dwell in tropical and temperate regions.