pock


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pock

 [pok]
a pustule, especially of smallpox.

pock

(pok),
The specific pustular cutaneous lesion of smallpox.
[A.S. poc, a pustule]

pock

(pŏk)
n.
1. A pustule caused by smallpox or a similar eruptive disease.
2. A mark or scar left in the skin by such a pustule; a pockmark.
tr.v. pocked, pocking, pocks
To mark with pocks; pit.

pock′y adj.

pock·mark

(pok'mahrk)
The small, depressed scar left after the healing of the smallpox pustule.
Synonym(s): pit (2) .
References in periodicals archive ?
Even after seeing the 82-year-old patient's pain evaporate so quickly with acupuncture treatment, Pock can understand why many physicians still have doubts.
Nylander and Jagr also assisted on Pock's goal as the Rangers swept the season series against the Bruins for the second consecutive year.
Some of these pock mark surfaces were deep enough to require welding above the casting contour.
No sooner had Pock kicked off than Fezan Mughal ran one in from 50 metres.
It's pocked with lists and charts: Carville's Top Five Ridiculous and Pathetic Republicans, Most Expensive Boondoggles, Biggest Hypocrites, Tips on Potato Salad, and an odd assortment of stuff Carville just wants to emphasize.
You may find the coverage is so lame or pocked with loopholes that it's worthless.
Taken by the Cassini spacecraft, the portrait shows that the moon, whose name in Greek means "afterthought", has an irregular shape and is pocked with soft-edged craters.
The beaches wore the colour of death As the sea of pink seeped into the shell pocked shore And the greedy jaws of battle Consumed them by the score
Allen's dialogue with art history is materialized via subtly "off" color combinations, vaguely skewed compositions, barely uneven surfaces slick and pocked, thin and layered, lacquered and bone dry.
Coming within 240 km of the comet's core and discerning features as small as 30 meters across, the craft unveiled a surprisingly pocked and varied terrain.
Subsequently presented in meticulously designed installations, these disparate and deceptively modest objects--among them distorted utility-style sinks, suitcases with storm-drain bottoms, and wax casts of a man's lower body pocked with sink drains--suggest a dreamlike and consistently personal symbology.
While many of the castings could be salvaged by time-consuming grinding and shotblasting, some were so badly pocked that they had to be scrapped.