pneumonitis


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Related to pneumonitis: pneumonia, Interstitial pneumonitis

pneumonitis

 [noo″mo-ni´tis]
inflammation of the lung; see also pneumonia.
hypersensitivity pneumonitis a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction to repeated inhalation of organic particles, usually in an occupational setting, with onset a few hours after exposure to the allergen. Many different substances are potential causes of the condition; see bagassosis, farmer's lung, and pigeon breeder's lung. Characteristics include fever, fatigue, chills, unproductive cough, tachycardia, and tachypnea; in the chronic form there is interstitial fibrosis with collagenous thickening of the alveolar septa. Called also extrinsic allergic alveolitis.
radiation pneumonitis lung inflammation resulting from radiation exposure, usually radiation therapy, with coughing, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltration of secretions, leading to mild to severe or even fatal fibrosis 6 to 9 months after the exposure.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pneu·mo·ni·tis

(nū'mō-nī'tis),
Inflammation of the lungs.
See also: pneumonia.
Synonym(s): pulmonitis
[G. pneumōn, lung, + -itis, inflammation]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pneumonitis

(no͞o′mə-nī′tĭs, nyo͞o′-)
n.
Inflammation of lung tissue.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pneumonitis

Pulmonology Inflammation of lung tissue. See Chemical pneumonitis, Desquamative interstitial pneumonitis, Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, Radiation pneumonitis, Reflux pneumonitis, Rheumatoid pneumonitis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pneu·mo·ni·tis

(nū'mō-nī'tis)
Inflammation of the lungs.
See also: pneumonia
Synonym(s): pulmonitis.
[G. pneumōn, lung, + -itis, inflammation]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pneumonitis

Inflammation of the lungs from any cause, including ALLERGY. See PNEUMONIA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Pneumonitis (aspiration)

Inflammation of the lung caused by inhaling a liquid, usually carbon based.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pneu·mo·ni·tis

(nū'mō-nī'tis)
Inflammation of the lungs.
See also: pneumonia
Synonym(s): pulmonitis.
[G. pneumōn, lung, + -itis, inflammation]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about pneumonitis

Q. PNEUMONIA is it viral or bacterial

A. Most importantly, it's crucial to get it cleared up as soon as possible. When I had it years ago, taking elderberry worked far better I felt than taking an antibiotic in which case my pneumonia didn't budge.
Elderberry can be taking by the tincture or oil being placed in a hot cup of tea and sipping frequently. It helps to loosen the congestion.

Q. What is pneumonia? Is pneumonia a simple cold gone bad or is it something else?

A. The common cold, the flu, and pneumonia can have similar symptoms.
The common cold is an infection of the upper respiratory tract. It is caused by a virus. A cold almost always starts with a scratchy throat and stuffiness in the nose. Gradually other symptoms appear--sneezing, a mild sore throat, sometimes a minor headache and coughing. Runny noses are a common feature of colds. In small children fevers can occur.
The flu is an infection in the nose, throat, bronchial tubes and lungs caused by influenza viruses A and B. Fever, chills, headache, achy muscles and fatigue all seem to come at once when you have the flu.
Pneumonia is an infection of the bronchial tubes and tiny air sacs in the lungs. Pneumonia is usually caused by a virus or bacteria. Symptoms begin suddenly with severe chills and a high fever. This infection typically follows a cold or flu. The person starts feeling better and then the symptoms suddenly worsen.

Q. How is pneumonia diagnosed? Quite a few of my son's classmates have caught pneumonia. How can I know if my son caught it too? How is pneumonia diagnosed?

A. When the doctor examines the patient and hears coarse breathing or crackling sounds when listening to a portion of the chest with a stethoscope, he can suspect Pneumonia. There may be wheezing, or the sounds of breathing may be faint in a particular area of the chest. A chest x-ray is usually ordered to confirm the diagnosis of pneumonia. There are more tests that can be done if the diagnosis has not been confirmed by the above tests.

More discussions about pneumonitis
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References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, the observations that the dermatitis generally required several days to manifest and that the radiographic changes of the pneumonitis did not appear for a week or more after the onset of symptoms suggested that direct toxic or irritant mechanisms were not solely responsible.
Patient-reported lung symptoms as an early signal of impending radiation pneumonitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiation: an observational study.
Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis is also a representative disease showing a BPIP-like histology.
Toxicities reported within the four phase I clinical trials included radiation pneumonitis, radiation dermatitis, pericardial effusion, tracheal necrosis, hypoxia and bronchitis [26-29].
Albeit uncommon, drug-related pneumonitis has also been reported with the use of single-agent nab-paclitaxel [18].
Latham, "Case report of electronic cigarettes possibly associated with eosinophilic pneumonitis in a previously healthy active-duty sailor," The Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol.
A rare complication and poor prognostic factor of lupus pneumonitis is pulmonary hypertension (PH), a complication our patient experienced.
In summary, we have described a patient who developed late-onset Grade 4 pneumonitis after nivolumab treatment accompanied by acute pulmonary embolism; rt-PA, high-dose corticosteroid therapy, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy were lifesaving.
Pneumonitis secondary to infections were the second common pulmonary manifestation (20%].
The efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in the management of children with kerosene-associated pneumonitis: A double-blind randomised controlled trial.
The higher prevalence of IPF (40.4%) in our region is important to note when compared with data from Greece (20.1%) and Saudi Arabia (23.3%).13,19 However, our data differs from the results of the prospective ILD registry in India in which hypersensitivity pneumonitis was found to be the most common ILD (47.35%).10 Data from a single-centre study from India showed similar findings with IPF present in 45% patients in the study.20 The results of logistic regression analysis showed that age more than 60 was significantly associated with IPF in our population.