pneumonic plague


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to pneumonic plague: bubonic plague

pneu·mon·ic plague

a rapidly progressive and frequently fatal form of plague in which there are areas of pulmonary consolidation, with chills, pain in the side, bloody expectoration, high fever, and possible human-to-human transmission.

pneumonic plague

[no̅o̅mon′ik]
Etymology: Gk, pneumon, lung; L, plaga, stroke
a highly virulent and rapidly fatal form of plague characterized by bronchopneumonia. There are two forms: primary pneumonic plague, which results from involvement of the lungs in the course of bubonic plague, and secondary pneumonic plague, which results from the inhalation of infected particles of sputum from a person having pneumonic plague. Aerolized Yersinia pestis could be used to cause pneumonic plague in a bioterrorism attack. Compare bubonic plague, septicemic plague. See also plague, Yersinia pestis.

pneu·mon·ic plague

(nū-mon'ik plāg)
A rapidly progressive and frequently fatal form of plague in which there are areas of pulmonary consolidation, with chills, pain in the side, bloody expectoration, and high fever.
See also: Yersinia pestis

pneumonic plague

A severe and often fatal complication of bubonic PLAGUE in which the infection spreads to the lungs. Unlike bubonic plague, pneumonic plague can spread directly from case to case.

pneumonic plague

see BLACK DEATH.

plague

an epidemic of disease attended by great mortality.

bubonic plague
an acute febrile, infectious, highly fatal disease caused by the bacillus Yersinia pestis. It is primarily a disease of rats and other rodents, dogs and cats, and is usually spread to humans by fleas. The more common form of plague is the bubonic. There is also a pneumonic type in humans, which can be spread directly from person to person by droplet infection. The clinical signs in all species are fever, vomiting and enlargement of lymph nodes, the buboes that give the disease its name.
cattle plague
duck plague
an acute infectious disease of ducks caused by a herpesvirus and characterized by tissue hemorrhages and blood free in body cavities, eruptions on the mucosae of the digestive tract, degeneration of parenchymatous organs and lesions in lymph nodes. Called also duck virus enteritis.
equine plague
see african horse sickness.
fowl plague
see avian influenza.
pneumonic plague
see bubonic plague (above).
septicemic plague
hematogenous spread of infection to many organs may occur without the formation of buboes; occurs in the cat with pulmonary involvement, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and death.
swine plague
see swine plague.
sylvatic plague
bubonic plague in wild animals in uninhabited areas. See also sylvatic plague.
References in periodicals archive ?
The transmissibility of primary pneumonic plague can be quantified by estimating the time-varying reproduction number, [R.
Protection of mice from fatal bubonic and pneumonic plague by passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies against the F1 protein of Yersinia pestis.
Like anthrax and pneumonic plague, tularemia organism could also be used in a biological attack.
Pneumonic plague is the least common and most deadly form of the disease, and the airborne bacteria can be directly transmitted between humans through inhalation.
While bubonic plague - usually transmitted by flea bite - can be treated with antibiotics if diagnosed early, pneumonic plague is one of the deadliest infectious diseases.
Pneumonic plague was one of the varieties of plague in the pandemic known as the ''Black Death'' that killed millions in 14th century Europe.
Thank God she had the bubonic plague because if she had had the pneumonic plague, I would have been dead in 24 hours," Dr.
Pneumonic plague occurs when the bacterium becomes lodged in the lungs either through the bacterium's presence in the blood or via inhalation.
At this drill I learned that pneumonic plague is transmitted from person to person: When an infected person coughs, droplets are inhaled by the second person.
Pneumonic plague has a rate-of-action course of one to seven days, a duration-of-action course of one to two weeks, and a lethality rate of about 90 percent in one to two days.
Participating in days three and four of the exercise, I was able to watch the expanding impacts of the initial attacks, including a fake bio terror incident in New Jersey's Union and Middlesex Counties, where pneumonic plague was launched from a sport utility vehicle with a commercial sprayer.