pneumatosis


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pneumatosis

 [noo″mah-to´sis]
air or gas in an abnormal location in the body.
pneumatosis cystoi´des intestina´lis a condition characterized by the presence of thin-walled, gas-containing cysts in the wall of the intestines. Called also intestinal emphysema.

pneu·ma·to·sis

(nū'mă-tō'sis),
Abnormal accumulation of gas in any tissue or part of the body.
[G. a blowing out]

pneumatosis

/pneu·ma·to·sis/ (-to´sis) [Gr.] air or gas in an abnormal location in the body.
pneumatosis cystoi´des intestina´lis  presence of thin-walled, gas-containing cysts in the wall of the intestines.

pneu·ma·to·sis

(nū'mă-tō'sis)
Abnormal accumulation of gas in any tissue or part of the body.
[G. a blowing out]

pneumatosis

air or gas in an abnormal location in the body.

pneumatosis coli
gas or air dissecting the tissues in the wall of the large intestine.
pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis
a condition characterized by the presence of thin-walled, gas-containing cysts in the wall of the intestines in humans, a condition similar to intestinal emphysema in pigs.
References in periodicals archive ?
17) Signs that suggest irreversible damage and warrant surgical resection of infarcted bowel include pneumatosis intestinalis and air within the portal venous system.
Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is characterized by the accumulation of air in the bowel wall.
After the first description of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis in 1730 by Du Vernoy in autopsy specimens, these entities were named in 1825 by Mayer.
Computed tomographic diagnosis of pneumatosis intestinalis.
The air may enter the retroperitoneum via a mesenteric route, via direct perforation or even via pneumatosis cystoides coli; then it may dissect along structures passing into the periphery including the great vessels and psoas muscle as in our case.
The pneumatosis of the intestine and significant depth of their location were the factors which presenting difficulties for precise diagnosis.
Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) or pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis, in association with portal venous gas, is a rare finding in children and young adults.
The plain film findings are nonspecific and may demonstrate multiple dilated bowel loops, pneumatosis intestinalis, portal venous gas or pneumoperitoneum.
Upon receipt of a verbal report from the radiologist that the CT scan showed extensive pneumatosis, small bowel ileus, air in the portal venous system and mild hydronephrosis, Dr.
Subsequent abdominal radiographs documented the presence of the jejunal atresia and pneumatosis intestinalis (PI), together with air in both the porta hepatis and liver parenchyma (Figs 1-3).
Laboratory results suggested bacterial sepsis, and in one case, there also was radiographic evidence of severe intestinal injury due to pneumatosis intestinalis.