pneuma


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pneu·ma

(nū'mă), In ancient Greek philosophy and medicine:
1. Air or an all-pervading fiery essence in the air (which today would be identified with oxygen), which was the creative and animating spirit of the universe; drawn into the body through the lungs, it generated and sustained the innate heat in the left ventricle of the heart and was distributed by the arteries to the brain and all parts of the body.
2. Soul or psyche.
[G. pneuma, air, breath]

pneuma

An obsolete term for:
(1) The pervasive fiery essence of air (oxygen); 
(2) Breath, intelligence, the psyche, the soul.
References in periodicals archive ?
He claimed that not only the optic nerve but all sensory nerves were hollow to enable the flow of 'psychic pneuma' (see below); sensory nerves originated in the meninges and motor nerves in the brain.
Kissei will attempt to get an early approval of Calfactant for the indication of Acute Lung Injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) utilizing the results of phase III clinical trial which will be conducted by Pneuma in the US.
Galeno, siguiendo a los estoicos, hace que todas las formas de vida dependan de cierta manifestacion o forma del pneuma cosmico.
Una vida que es, en cuanto comunicada, su mismo Pneuma. El Espiritu nos hace participes de la naturaleza divina, es decir consortes de la naturaleza del Logos (23).
necessarily disjointed and increasingly chaotic account of the pneuma as
Later, at the Museum of Classical Archaeology in Cambridge, I draped the West Pediment from the Temple of Zeus at Olympia with cloth animated by a theatre wind machine for a work called Pneuma. This also animated the clothes and hair-dos of visitors but it essentially revealed the bodies of the statues beneath, which seemed to press themselves against the billowing fabric.
However, in ancient Hebrew, a language classified within the Afro-Asiatic family of languages, ruah ha-qodesh meant 'holy spirit,' which was later translated into Greek pneuma hagion and thence Latin spiritus sanctus.
In ancient Greek, pneuma is the word for air or breath, from pnein, to breathe; it gives us words like pneumatic (full of air) and pneumonia (a disease of our air/lung organs).
From this, it shouldn't come as a surprise that the Hebrew word for spirit may also be translated as "wind" or "breath." Similarly, the word "spiritual" in the Greek New Testament comes from the root word "pneuma," from which come our English words pneumonia or pneumatic--which also can be translated as breath or wind.
The spirit (Pneuma) is related to the spiritual realm, while the soul (Psyche) is concerned with our thoughts, feelings and decision making, (Rational, Emotional and Volitional) and finally the body (Soma) our physical earth suit that deals with the five senses.
Although none of these passages mentions ether by name, it seems likely they are referring to it; however, they establish no more than an analogy between ether and the "breath of life" (pneuma) in living things.