plumage

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plumage

(plo͞o′mĭj)
n.
The covering of feathers on a bird.

plum′aged adj.

plumage

the feather coat of a bird for one molt.
References in periodicals archive ?
These fashion icons have engaged in this plumaged indulgence and set off a flock of trendy knockoffs in all price ranges, seen on everything from fans to fantasy gowns by Jessica McClintock, Zum Zum and Bonjour.
No, these modest iridescent, beige-tipped feathers are from the ostentatiously plumaged Ocellated Turkey endemic to the Yucatan Peninsular in Mexico and in neighboring Guatemala and Belize.
Curled up in all sorts of uncomfortable positions, the brightly plumaged sisters vied with their stronger brethren in seeking balmy sleep.
We observed a chick plumaged differently from the two distinct variants described by Stempniewicz (1989) in Hornsund in 2011.
Pterodroma Mollis is the Latin name for a kind of seabird known as the Soft Plumaged Petrel.
When the winter light turns to grey, even the brightest plumaged wildfowl lose their colour, so it took a dashing merlin to brighten upmy day as it sped past me on Banks Marsh.
One day you will wake up in the Cirque hotel, eating breakfast served by a Mystere clown in a brightly plumaged avian outfit, with a Zumanity contortionist spinning the political news on cable TV, and soft indecipherable Rene Dupere music piped into a KA-inspired suite.
BRIGHTLY PLUMAGED BIRDS, delicate butterflies, playful prairie dogs, majestic elk, and curious toads share nature's bounty along the U.
The "iliaca" group consists of reddish plumaged birds distributed from Newfoundland to northern Alaska, with little geographic variation.
Like virtually every swift species -- and there are many -- it is drably plumaged in dark brown, relieved only by small pale patch on the throat.
The Audubon Society began honorably as a justified reaction to 19th-century market hunting, which was satisfying ladies' fashion demands for fancy hat feathers, largely from herons, egrets and other beautifully plumaged wild birds.
In both lab and field experiments, female house finches prefer to mate with the most brightly plumaged males available (Hill 1990, 1991).