plicate

(redirected from plicated)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to plicated: colpocleisis

plicate

 [pli´kāt]
plaited or folded.

pli·cate

(plī'kāt),
Folded; pleated; tucked.

plicate

/pli·cate/ (pli´kāt) plaited or folded.

pli·cate

(plī'kāt)
Folded; pleated; tucked.

plicate

folded, ridged or pleated.

plicate

plaited or folded.
References in periodicals archive ?
This mobilizes the connective tissue layer to the lateral sidewalls and allows a separate layer to be plicated between the vagina and rectum.
For a scholar who wishes to champion "philology" (in her title and in her recourse to the editorial products of humanistic philology cited in Lohenstein's notes), Newman displays an unexpected naivete (and condescension) about the actual practice of philology, characterizing Just's apparatus as "com plicated and confusing.
Quite frequently, the plicated breve (half note) indicates the filling in of a melodic third, transcribed by Cross as two quarter notes and by Leech-Wilkinson as a dotted-quarter followed by an eighth.
Words are played with until the dream possibilities have been teased out: "in the end it was me implicat- / ed tho i had been played & plyered or plicated from the beginning.
With the gastric pouch wall on suction, the pouch wall was circumferentially plicated with serial firings of 6mm 3-0 polypropylene fasteners.
After the bleeding sites in the stomach were plicated, the wound was closed.
After a median of 23 months of followup, 30% of the standard anterior colporrhaphy group had satisfactory or optimal anatomic results, compared with 42% of the group receiving standard colporrhaphy plus polyglactin 910 (Vicryl) mesh and 46% of women receiving ultralateral anterior colporrhaphy, in which tissue is dissected and plicated very laterally, outside of the normal vaginal plane of dissection.
Very few people earning this amount would be in a position to contribute the pounds 5,000 per annum suggested by the Government as the ceiling for tax relie and the current proposals might be too com plicated for saving smaller amounts.
Here the thirteenth-century cantio itself is given, once with the five Latin verses of its source and again with a Middle English paraphrase from the same manuscript; the music does not require this luxurious spacing over two openings--we are told that the original scribe wrote the music out but once, evidently changing not so much as a plicated note for the English setting--but full printing of the texts on pages facing the music does seem to require it.