plexus


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Related to plexus: choroid plexus

plexus

 [plek´sus] (pl. plex´us, plexuses) (L.)
a network or tangle, chiefly of veins or nerves; see also rete. adj., adj plex´al.
plexus basila´ris a venous plexus of the dura mater located over the basilar part of the occipital bone and the posterior part of the body of the sphenoid bone, extending from the cavernous sinus to the foramen magnum.
brachial plexus see brachial plexus.
cardiac plexus the plexus around the base of the heart, chiefly in the epicardium, formed by cardiac branches from the vagus nerves and the sympathetic trunks and ganglia, and made up of sympathetic, parasympathetic, and visceral afferent fibers that innervate the heart.
carotid p's nerve plexuses surrounding the common, external, and internal carotid arteries.
celiac plexus solar plexus.
cervical plexus a nerve plexus formed by the ventral branches of the first four cervical spinal nerves and supplying the structures in the region of the neck. One important branch is the phrenic nerve, which supplies the diaphragm.
choroid plexus infoldings of blood vessels of the pia mater covered by a thin coat of ependymal cells that form tufted projections into the third, fourth, and lateral ventricles of the brain; they secrete the cerebrospinal fluid.
coccygeal plexus a nerve plexus formed by the ventral branches of the coccygeal and fifth sacral nerve and by a communication from the fourth sacral nerve, giving off the anococcygeal nerves.
cystic plexus a nerve plexus near the gallbladder.
dental plexus either of two plexuses (inferior and superior) of nerve fibers, one from the inferior alveolar nerve, situated around the roots of the lower teeth, and the other from the superior alveolar nerve, situated around the roots of the upper teeth.
lumbar plexus one formed by the ventral branches of the second to fifth lumbar nerves in the psoas major muscle (the branches of the first lumbar nerve often are included).
lumbosacral plexus the lumbar and sacral plexuses considered together, because of their continuous nature.
lymphatic plexus an interconnecting network of lymph vessels that provides drainage of lymph in a one-way flow. An example is the lymphocapillary vessels, collecting vessels, and trunks.
myenteric plexus a nerve plexus situated in the muscular layers of the intestines.
nerve plexus a plexus composed of intermingled nerve fibers.
pampiniform plexus
1. in the male, a plexus of veins from the testis and the epididymis, constituting part of the spermatic cord.
2. in the female, a plexus of ovarian veins draining the ovary.
sacral plexus a plexus arising from the ventral branches of the last two lumbar and first four sacral spinal nerves.
solar plexus see solar plexus.
tympanic plexus a network of nerve fibers supplying the mucous lining of the tympanum, mastoid air cells, and pharyngotympanic tube.

plex·us

, pl.

plex·us

,

plex·us·es

(plek'sŭs, -sŭs-ez), [TA] Avoid the incorrect plural plexi.
A network or interjoining, often complex, of nerves, blood vessels, or lymphatic vessels.
[L. a braid]

plexus

(plĕk′səs)
n. pl. plexus or plex·uses
1. A structure in the form of a network, especially of nerves, blood vessels, or lymphatics: the cardiac plexus; the pelvic plexus.
2. A combination of interlaced parts; a network.

plexus

A network of interlaced nerves or vessels. See Brachial plexus, Cervical plexus, Hemorrhoidal plexus, Lumbar plexus, Myenteric plexus, Sacral plexus, Submucous plexus.

plex·us

, pl. plexus (plek'sŭs) [TA]
A network or interjoining of nerves and blood vessels or of lymphatic vessels.
[L. a braid]

plexus

Any interlacing network, as of nerves, blood or lymph vessels. The solar plexus is a network of AUTONOMIC nerve fibres lying on the abdominal AORTA.

plexus

a network of interlaced blood vessels or nerves.

plexus 

A network of interweaving nerves, blood vessels or lymphatic vessels.
cavernous plexus A network of nerve fibres derived from the internal carotid nerve and located on the inferomedial aspect of the internal carotid artery in the cavernous sinus. It supplies sympathetic innervation via the ciliary and gasserian ganglia to almost all of the orbit, including fibres to the dilator pupillae muscle, Müller's superior palpebral muscle, the ciliary muscle and vasoconstrictor fibres for the blood vessels of the eye. See Horner's syndrome.
ciliary venous plexus A network of vessels situated in the outer portion of the ciliary body. It receives blood from the ciliary muscle and drains into anterior ciliary vein. It also communicates with the intrascleral venous plexus. Syn. ciliary plexus.
deep episcleral plexus See pericorneal plexus.
episcleral venous plexus A network of vessels near the limbus which receives blood from the intrascleral plexus and canal of Schlemm via collector channels and drains into the anterior ciliary veins. It also receives blood from the conjunctival veins and drains the perilimbal conjunctiva.
internal carotid plexus A network of nerve fibres derived from the internal carotid nerve and located on the lateral side of the internal carotid artery near the apex of the petrous bone. It sends sympathetic axons to the abducens, ophthalmic and nasociliary nerves, the deep petrosal nerve, the caroticotympanic nerve and the ophthalmic and lacrimal arteries. See superior cervical ganglion.
intrascleral venous plexus A network of vessels situated in the deep layers of the sclera near the limbus. It is made up of the deep and mid scleral plexuses. It receives aqueous humour from the canal of Schlemm via collector channels, as well as blood from the ciliary venous plexus. It drains into the anterior ciliary veins.
pericorneal plexus A network of vessels situated around the limbus and formed by the anastomosing of the episcleral arteries (branches of the anterior ciliary arteries) and the conjunctival arteries. It forms a series of arcades parallel to the corneal margin. This plexus is arranged in two layers: (1) a superficial conjunctival pericorneal plexus liable to injection in inflammation of the superficial cornea or conjunctiva (conjunctival injection) (2) a deep episcleral plexus liable to injection in diseases of the iris, ciliary body or deep portion of the cornea, or angle-closure glaucoma (ciliary injection). See ciliary arteries; anterior ciliary vein.

plex·us

, pl. plexus (plek'sŭs) [TA]
A network or interjoining of nerves and blood vessels or of lymphatic vessels.
[L. a braid]
References in periodicals archive ?
Plexus chief executive Ben van Bilderbeek said: "The formation of PPC enables Plexus to supply Christmas trees as part of a package solution for the first time.
Resection of tumor is the choice in most of benign and malignant brachial plexus tumors (7).
Coeliac plexus neurolysis is the therapeutic ablation of the coeliac plexus where the Radiologist uses CT-guided imaging to inject a neurolytic agent, such as ethanol, to permanently destroy the coeliac plexus.
Under the terms of the licence agreement Plexus will receive royalties based on the invoice value of any Plexus products rented or sold by Gusar or Konar.
We proceeded to inject to fill the posterior plane of the SCM muscle, where the cervical nerves exist to achieve an effective cervical plexus block and surgical anesthesia.
There are several factors that must be considered prior to performing a chemical neurolysis of the brachial plexus. Proper patient selection is essential due to the unique consequences of the procedure.
Abduction of the arm to 90[grados] has been shown to decrease the distance from skin to the brachial plexus via ultrasound guidance [14]; however, performing abduction maneuvers would be extremely difficult in patients with severe shoulder and/or rotator cuff pathologic processes.
compared conventional "landmark-based" and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus anaesthesia using both interscalene and axillary approaches, and reported that the use of ultrasonography improved the onset and completeness of sensory and motor blocks.12 Soeding et al.12 reported that the onset of sensory block was 5 minutes faster with ultrasound guidance than with nerve stimulation.
Various algorithms have been devised for closed and open nerve and brachial plexus injuries to calculate appropriate time for intervention.
[7] In adults, most choroid plexus papillomas are heterogenous, secondary to cystic degeneration and or calcification.
We describe the successful treatment of a patient with progressive complaints of a delayed brachial plexus compression due to a 15-year-old nonunion midshaft clavicle fracture.
Plexus Capital has announced the successful closing of Plexus Fund IV at its fully subscribed offering of USD400 million, the company said.