pleurodesis


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pleurodesis

 [ploo͡-rod´ĕ-sis]
the artificial production of adhesions between the parietal and the visceral pleura for treatment of persistent pneumothorax or severe pleural effusion; formerly done by physically irritating the pleural surface, it is now usually done with a chemical sclerosing agent.

pleur·od·e·sis

(plūr-od'ĕ-sis),
The creation of a fibrous adhesion between the visceral and parietal layers of the pleura, thus obliterating the pleural cavity; it is performed surgically by abrading the pleura or by inserting a sterile irritant into the pleural space, and applied as treatment in cases of malignant pleural effusion, recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, and chylothorax.
[pleuro- + G. desis, a binding together]

pleurodesis

A procedure in which the pleural space is obliterated by deliberately fusing the visceral and parietal pleura, either by using chemical sclerosants (e.g., a mixture of mitoxantrone, talc and tetracycline) or mechanically (e.g., by stripping the pleura), to treat recurrent pneumothorax or malignant pleural effusion secondary to cancer.

pleurodesis

Thoracic surgery A procedure in which the visceral and parietal pleura are deliberately fused, either by inducing chemical–eg, talc-inflammation or mechanically–eg, by stripping the pleura, to treat recurrent pneumothorax

pleur·od·e·sis

(plūr-od'ĕ-sis)
The creation of a fibrous adhesion between the visceral and parietal layers of the pleura, obliterating the pleural cavity; it is performed surgically by abrading the pleura or by inserting a sterile irritant into the pleural cavity in cases of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, malignant pleural effusion, and chylothorax.
[pleuro- + G. desis, a binding together]

pleurodesis

the production of adhesions between the visceral and parietal pleurae. May be produced intentionally by the instillation of irritating drugs into the pleural cavity or by abrading the visceral and parietal pleural surfaces to achieve adhesions. Called also pleural symphysis, pleural sclerosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
CO] <20% (relative) Giant bullae (>1/3 of hemithorax) Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency Previous thoracotomy, pleurodesis or chest wall deformity Excessive sputum Severe pulmonary hypertension (>50 mmHg) Active infection Unstable cardiac conditions Significant pleural or interstitial changes on HRCT Any type of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy that cannot be stopped for 7 days prior to procedure [FEV.
To prevent recurrence pleurodesis, stapling, or surgical excision may be employed.
Current treatments include drainage of fluid using indwelling catheters or pleurodesis, a sometimes painful procedure in which the membranes around the lungs are fused together, preventing further accumulation of fluid but leading to a few days of hospitalization.
If it does recur, a pleurodesis procedure can be done to get the lung to stick better to the chest wall using a special talc.
Causes of Necrosis in Mesothelial Proliferations Malignant tumor Empyema Mycobacterial and fungal infections Talc pleurodesis Table 3.
The patient was treated with medical thoracoscopy (MT) and talc pleurodesis.
Treatment options include thoracentesis, chemical sclerosis/talc pleurodesis, chemotherapy, radiation, and placement of a long-term indwelling catheter such as Tenckhoff or Pleurx[R].
This case underwent only under-water sealed drainage since the timing and importance of pleurodesis and thoracotomy for recurrent PTXs have not yet been established.
A reasonable palliative approach is complete drainage of the pleural effusion (by tube thoracostomy or video thoracoscopy) and pleurodesis (10).
Pleurodesis is routinely used for the treatment of recurrent pleural effusion.