respirophasic pain

(redirected from pleuritic pain)

respirophasic pain

pain, often mistakenly termed pleuritic, which occurs or worsens synchronously with the respiratory cycle.
Synonym(s): pleuritic pain
[L. re-spiro, to breathe, + G. phasis, recurring appearance, as of a star, fr. phaino, to appear, + -ic]
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The symptom analysis revealed 45% had symptoms like pleuritic pain, cough with or without breathlessness [Figure 2].
A 69-year-old woman with pleuritic pain and a pulmonary arterial obstruction.
One week postoperatively, the patient presented to the emergency department for a worsening nonproductive cough that intensified when supine, and was associated with subscapular pleuritic pain.
Hours later the patient complained for new-onset sudden bilateral pleuritic pain with accompanied difficulty in breathing.
Significant univariate predictors pertaining to chest pain history included pleuritic pain (7% vs.
Pleuritic pain may indicate haemorrhage in the pericardial sac, with the potential for acute cardiac tamponade.
Possible accompanying pulmonary symptoms might include pleuritic pain, hemoptysis, cough, orthopnea, tachypnea, wheezing, rales, decreased breath sounds, an accentuated pulmonic component of the heart sound, and jugular venous distension.
A 65 year old smoker presented with a five week history of considerable left sided pleuritic pain and shortness of breath following a severe bout of coughing.
Typical symptoms that are present in FMF patients include irregular occurring attacks of fever lasting between 24 to 72 hours, polyserositis causing severe abdominal or pleuritic pain, attacks of arthritis that usually last up to 7 days and possibly painful, swollen skin lesion on the lower legs.
4% and haemoglobin concentration <8 g/dl should have early initiation of ART since they are more likely to have a low CD4+ cell count, whereas those presenting with pleuritic pain are less likely to have a low CD4+ count.
Recurrent episodes of pneumonia, including the signs of fever and productive cough, are the most common, but nonspecific symptoms including chest pain, pleuritic pain, shortness of breath and wheezing could be found at presentation.
Malignant pleural effusion: accumulation of fluid in the pleural space with malignant cells within it; may cause severe dyspnea, chest tightness, pleuritic pain, and cough