pleural

(redirected from pleural infection)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to pleural infection: Light's criteria, Pulmonary effusion

pleur·al

(plūr'ăl), Do not confuse this word with plural.
Relating to the pleura.

pleural

adjective Referring to the pleura.

pleur·al

(plūr'ăl)
Relating to the pleura.

Pleural

Pleural refers to the pleura or membrane that enfolds the lungs.
Mentioned in: Pneumothorax
References in periodicals archive ?
The bacteriology of pleural infection by genetic and standard methods and its mortality significance.
Despite of all these, there is great variation worldwide in the management of patients with pleural infection and approaches differ between physicians.
There are also a large number of non-comparative studies advocating the use of small-bore drains in pleural infection. This is due to high success rates with some data suggesting success of up to 91%.
However, Bacteroides is a common cause of intrapulmonary abscess and pleural infection. Yauba et al.
Lee, "Intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and deoxyribonuclease therapy for pleural infection," Journal of Thoracic Disease, vol.
IPC related complications include 8 patients (3.7%) with nondraining IPC requiring intervention and 6 patients (2.8%) who developed pleural infection. The IPC remained in place for a median of 34 days after the procedure.
Intrapleural streptokinase was of no benefit in patients with pleural infection in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
Several authorities (Bayes et al., 1987; Postmus, Kerstjens, de Boer, Homan van der Heide, & Koeter, 1989; Shamji et al., 1983) report that open-window thoracoscopy controls the pleural infection, allows patients to recover from the toxic effects of sepsis, and prevents aspiration of bacteria into the remaining lung when patients have a bronchopleural fistula.
The MIST-2 study reiterated the fact where use of t-PA and DNase combination therapy in patients with pleural infection improved drainage of pleural empyema, resulting in reduction in hospital stay and need for thoracic surgery intervention [18].
[1] The term is often wrongly used in much wider sense to include all phases of pleural infection from an infected turbid effusion to a mature abscess containing thick pus.
If there is an increase in the yield of culture by inoculating the pleural fluid into enrichment media, the spectrum of the various organisms causing pleural infection and their antibiotic sensitivity can be identified and thus help in appropriate treatment.