plethoric


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Related to plethoric: polycythemia

ple·thor·ic

(ple-thōr'ik, pleth'ŏ-rik),
Relating to plethora.
Synonym(s): sanguine (1) , sanguineous (2)

plethoric

(plĕ-thôr′ĭk, -thŏr′-, plĕth′ə-rĭk)
adj.
Characterized by an overabundance of blood.

ple·thor′i·cal·ly adv.

plethoric

adjective Fluid-filled, edematous

ple·thor·ic

(plĕ-thōr'ik)
Relating to plethora (hypervolemia).
Synonym(s): sanguine (1) , sanguineous (2) .

plethoric

Having a ruddy complexion from widening of blood vessels under the skin or, rarely, from POLYCYTHAEMIA.
References in periodicals archive ?
14) Howard Barker, "Identifying Some Platitudes with Regard to the Plethoric Text," Studies in Theatre and Performance 32 (2012): 251-53 (252).
Repeat transthoracic echocardiography showed enlarged right ventricle and right atrium associated with plethoric inferior vena cava.
In this sense, the suggestion of critics that Ferdinand suffers a disease brought on by a repressed sexuality (directed towards his sister, no less, as his "monstrous" ailment reflects his monstrous animal passions) means that his plethoric, not psychological ailment, must also be seen to go hand in hand with the far less recognized view that the Duchess's sexuality is also keyed to reflect pathology: "My sister, oh
65) The plethoric references to the fact that Russell Yates is a "NASA computer engineer" (66) further the impression that this is an economically sound, respectable, middle-class family.
And it's true Big Blue was and is devoted to no cause higher than the 'excessive uniformity of citation forms,' and creates significant negative externalities by sustaining 'an atmosphere of formality and redundancy in which the drab, Latinate, plethoric, euphemistic style of law reviews and judicial opinions flourishes.
We were married the following week by a plethoric, rasping Catholic priest, a Father Mendoza, from a neighboring town.
Devlin and Tischler follow each entry with plethoric supporting information to flesh out the people and episodes Williams describes.
Fothergill's `chief use of antimony was in chronic distempers, perhaps especially in plethoric conditions, where it quieted the circulation and acted too as an eliminant', wrote his biographer, R.
Melville's description of the whale being eaten by its own light holds as well for what he hopes will be the self-evidencing and performing rhetoric of Moby-Dick: "[L]like a plethoric burning martyr, or a self-consuming misanthrope, once ignited, the whale supplies his own fuel and burns by his own body" (353).
If modernism seems a catch-all rubric for this plethoric body of criticism, it's an index of our narrower horizons that we feel odd about applying the term to a man who wanted above all to see people ethically educated and well housed (preferably under pitched roofs).
a) One's surprise on first reading Eluard's poetry comes from the plethoric simultaneity of prototypes (idiosyncracies, some say) in his expression and craft: anti-rhetorical fanaticism, fragmentation, abolition of punctuation, extremely bold use of adjective, and usually brief yet extremely comprehensive verse.
The existence, and so far unknown function, of these additional genes in the already plethoric Mimivirus genome could radically change the current understanding of the way large viruses operate.