plerosis

plerosis

An obsolete term for regeneration of tissues following a period of atrophy.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Transition from metaphysical pessimism to metaphysical optimism; the metaphysical point of orientation is no longer death and its proxies (emptiness, kenosis, absence, dysfunctionality) but rather psychologically experienced or fictionally framed states of transcendence (resurrection, passage to Nirvana, love, catharsis, fulfillment or plerosis, deification etc.).
Terminologicamente, a teoria fisiologica acerca do prazer pode ser compreendida, conforme o texto em grego, pelas seguintes palavras-chave (i) hedone/prazer; (ii) plerosis, termo que pode ser compreendido como processo de preenchimento; (iii) endeia, termo que pode ser traduzido como deficiencia e (iv) epithymia/apetite.
officinalis aqueous extract (containing most of the MOP) was more effective than the alcohol extract in promoting spermatogenesis and encouraging the plerosis of injured reproductive organs [4, 5], indicating that MOP may be the main effective component that tonifies the kidney and strengthens yang in M.
If Hegel begins with Paul's notion of kenosis (emptying), he subordinates it to and fits it inside a larger story of plerosis, of the "pleroma," the fullness and completion of time, filling what is lacking in the body of Christ.
Plerosis and kenosis; understanding poetic language and its energies.
It began as his doctoral dissertation years ago and advances the idea that great or moving poetry juxtaposes the desire to say more (plerosis) and speaks to universal truths on the one hand and the desire for concision and precision, if not purity, in language (kenosis).
Plerosis, the filling of time with new beginnings, is characterised by a time of superabundant power, of wild, fruitful excess.
Armand creates a large text that exists within an ancient dialectical tension: "The archaic pre-Christian antinomies of kenosis and plerosis, emptying and filling, characteristic of early Middle Eastern civilizations, served largely as a generalized and suggestive context" (138).
1 Andras Hamori, On the Art of Medieval Arabic Literature (Princeton, 1974), has drawn on Mauss's notions of ritual and on kenosis and plerosis. SPS points out that the most important reliance on Gaster has been Adnan Haydar, "The Muallaqa of Imru al-Qays .
Kenosis is epitomized by the rituals of: washing or cleansing, removal of impurity, confession and repentance, and Plerosis is characterized by rebirth and new life through rituals of, Merging from the water.