pleonexia


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pleonexia

 [ple″o-nek´se-ah]
1. a psychiatric disorder characterized by greediness; excessive desire for acquisition of wealth or objects.
2. the condition of being pleonectic.

pleonexia

(plē″ō-nĕk′sē-ă) [Gr.]
Having a morbid desire for possession of material things; greediness.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it is precisely here where Eve's narcissistic thespian pleonexia (over-reaching) leads her to her final fate.
The poverty of Cavafy's Ithaca is contrasted to the rich adventure it made possible, and corresponds to Camus' attack on what Plato characterized as pleonexia (insatiable appetite and greed) in the Republic.
Apparently, Voegelin assumes that merely to have represented utopian ideas in a fiction is a source of negative social consequences: "More has the dubious historical merit of having expressed for the first time the full pleonexia of secular reason, justice, and morality.
It is this sharing with God and each other that would generate enjoyment of the fruits of God's garden and that distinguishes it from "hedonism, covetousness, or the greed of pleonexia.
If pleonexia, the desire for more than one's fair share, reigns and if all goods must be sought competitively, friendship seems incompatible with wholehearted pursuit of human happiness.
The human penchant for spiralling desire has been much maligned by philosophers--the ancient Greeks called it pleonexia, a form of psychic pathology--but clearly it has been adaptive in evolutionary terms.
In hindsight, we know this pleonexia was endemic to the strategy of Gonzalez-Torres and his gallerist, Andrea Rosen, taking full economic advantage of the certifiable ambiguities in his work.
The "desire to acquire" may be compared to the Hellenic idea of greed or pleonexia.
The Greek word pleonexia (insatiability, avarice) is related to the verbs pleonazo ("to have too much" or "grow too big;' see 2 Cor.
wants" is what the ancients would have called pleonexia.
Philargyria describes avarice as the love of money; pleonexia refers to broader sort of greed for more of everything.
In keeping with the general theme of depicting a proper understanding of egoism, this account of productiveness also flatly rejects there being any place for "greed" (understood as pleonexia (17)) in the good life.