pleonexia


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pleonexia

 [ple″o-nek´se-ah]
1. a psychiatric disorder characterized by greediness; excessive desire for acquisition of wealth or objects.
2. the condition of being pleonectic.

pleonexia

(plē″ō-nĕk′sē-ă) [Gr.]
Having a morbid desire for possession of material things; greediness.
References in periodicals archive ?
In reverse, then, the government, acting on behalf of the whole, must not require of the individual more than that due; such a requirement would be unjust, an instance of pleonexia (e.g., confiscatory taxation).
Apparently, Voegelin assumes that merely to have represented utopian ideas in a fiction is a source of negative social consequences: "More has the dubious historical merit of having expressed for the first time the full pleonexia of secular reason, justice, and morality.
In Polybius, this sort of moral judgement is limited only to the creation of imperialism: he condemned the greed (pleonexia) of the Spartans, because they were the first (protoi) of the Greeks to go to war with their neighbours in order to capture land and to enslave the Messenians (Polybius 6.49.1-2).
It is this sharing with God and each other that would generate enjoyment of the fruits of God's garden and that distinguishes it from "hedonism, covetousness, or the greed of pleonexia." (12) Right relationships before God and among people are prerequisites for both the correct generation of affluence and its equitable allotment.
Meikle is right in saying that as transactions whose end is money for the sake of money leads though it may not be exactly greedy but often leads to this, pleonexia, since there is no natural limit for these transactions.
The human penchant for spiralling desire has been much maligned by philosophers--the ancient Greeks called it pleonexia, a form of psychic pathology--but clearly it has been adaptive in evolutionary terms.
In hindsight, we know this pleonexia was endemic to the strategy of Gonzalez-Torres and his gallerist, Andrea Rosen, taking full economic advantage of the certifiable ambiguities in his work.
The "desire to acquire" may be compared to the Hellenic idea of greed or pleonexia.
The Greek word pleonexia (insatiability, avarice) is related to the verbs pleonazo ("to have too much" or "grow too big;' see 2 Cor.