pleonasm


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pleonasm

 [ple´o-nazm]
an excess of parts.

ple·o·nasm

(plē'ō-nazm),
Excess in number or size of parts.
[G. pleonasmos, exaggeration, excessive, fr. pleiōn, more]

ple·o·nasm

(plē'ō-nazm)
Excess in number or size of parts.
[G. pleonasmos, exaggeration, excessive, fr. pleiōn, more]

pleonasm

an excess of parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other "unintentional" pleonasms include double use of conjunctions and/ or adverbs with the same or very similar meaning, as well as incorrect usage of words with Latinate origin.
However, his editing expanded more than pared, and the pleonasms remain a dominant formal device.
Pleonasm is a semantic notion with diverse structural manifestations defined by its redundancy and the semantic similarity of its constituents.
Venturing further afield to comment on the original form of Lynne Burgess's Christian name, Biswell remarks on the difficulties confronting an Englishman trying to pronounce the fabled Welsh "consonantal double L" (72), thus coining a pleonasm that Llewela's husband would never have let slip--despite his being condescendingly referred to as an "inspired amateur" of a linguist by Peter Green, a novelist-translator cited approvingly in The Real Life (291).
Herbert Simon, in his entry "Behavioral Economics" in The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics and Law (1998), pointed out that the term "behavioral economics" is a sort of pleonasm, for what else is economics about than a study of human behavior?
peace means an end to all hostilities, and to attach the adjective "perpetual" to it is already suspiciously close to pleonasm.
This doctoral dissertation, completed in 1999 and published in 2003, explores the relationship between professional historiography (the author uses the pleonasm 'Historiographiegeschichtsschreibung') and literary realism, as exemplified in the writings of Theodor Fontane.
196) kind of structural pleonasm that some very seasoned scho lars still indulge in.
Webster's definition sounds like a good example of pleonasm
In other words, it is when a scholar's vanity/insecurity leads him to write primarily to communicate and reinforce his own status as an Intellectual that his English is deformed by pleonasm and pretentious diction (whose function is to signal the writer's erudition) and by opaque abstraction (whose function is to keep anybody from pinning the writer down to a definite assertion that can maybe be refuted or shown to be silly).
In the course of the speeches Polemon utilizes the entire spectrum of rhetorical and grammatical tropes and figures, especially hyperbole, chiasm, and pleonasm.
Its targets are the southern California life-style and American consumer culture--note the double-edged irony of the album's title, a pleonasm commonly used in sixties advertising that could just as easily have originated in the counterculture.