pleonasm


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pleonasm

 [ple´o-nazm]
an excess of parts.

ple·o·nasm

(plē'ō-nazm),
Excess in number or size of parts.
[G. pleonasmos, exaggeration, excessive, fr. pleiōn, more]

ple·o·nasm

(plē'ō-nazm)
Excess in number or size of parts.
[G. pleonasmos, exaggeration, excessive, fr. pleiōn, more]

pleonasm

an excess of parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
This leads to posing the question: What type of pleonasm are we dealing with in the case of DC in ME?
Virgil's periphrases, which in their wordiness I count as another type of pleonasm, can sound quite affected.
The "odious and detestable cryme of witchecraft, inchantment, and sorcerie" clearly involved pleonasm since the "cryme" was singular, John Hill Burton and others, eds.
Kant states that the phrase "general concept" is a pleonasm.
Also responsible for this copia verborum (plenitude of words) is the pleonasm - when two words are used that largely overlap in meaning: "true and lasting," "recognized and accepted.
Strictly speaking, such expressions are pleonasms and thus to be avoided, but they are common in the legal literature, and I use them for the sake of clarity and emphasis.
Language must be liberated from its role in the economy of exchange through the use of esoteric language and pleonasms, of unusual comparisons which confounded the distinctions conventionally made between the senses (Baudelaire's "correspondances"), and disjointed syntax.
Lope next deals with the objection that the Arcadia is affected and maintains that the use of adjectives (epitetos) and pleonasms to amplify and create majesty are part of the Arcadia's poetic, not historical, prose (e.
Crippled and corrupted by Independent Thought, even the juxtaposition of positive buzzwords (Creative, Innovative, Future-Oriented, Concern for the Other) starts to sound less like the bread and butter of university life and more like a cottage cheese of pleonasms spread over the insubstantial rice-cracker of vacuity
Moretti also offers a survey of the Latin language and style in which the PA is written: as one would expect, the PA contains morphological patterns in word-formation associated with Christian authors (for example, refrigerium and aedificatio), and it displays numerous features of late and vulgar Latin, for instance, diminutives, pleonasms, a preference for analytical over synthetic forms (for example, prepositional constructions instead of constructions involving cases without prepositions), several quod/quia/quoniam + subjunctive constructions instead of constructions requiring only an infinitive, the use of the indicative mood in indirect questions, the employment of the so-called nominativus pendens, and so on.