pleonasm


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pleonasm

 [ple´o-nazm]
an excess of parts.

ple·o·nasm

(plē'ō-nazm),
Excess in number or size of parts.
[G. pleonasmos, exaggeration, excessive, fr. pleiōn, more]

ple·o·nasm

(plē'ō-nazm)
Excess in number or size of parts.
[G. pleonasmos, exaggeration, excessive, fr. pleiōn, more]
References in periodicals archive ?
The relativizers which and who, in turn, are observed to be sporadically used in combination with this pleonasm.
So, will the term cloud security soon be considered a pleonasm? In other words, will the cloud soon become synonymous with security?
The paradoxical trope of practical constraint as both limitation and liberty is nowhere clearer than in the book's digressions, which in their wandering trajectories exemplify Burton's use of paratactic strategies such as the pleonasm and the list.
However, this would be a pleonasm, since all higher functions are cerebral.
Against this background "strategic entrepreneurship" seems to be a pleonasm (Dr.
Marc Crepon, Bernard Stiegler showed that the participatory democracy is not a pleonasm. The participatory democracy as a "direct democracy" may be opposed to representative democracy, but it musn't misinterpreted as a form of populism (2).
Cults were not about a "leader." To talk of a "modern cult of the leader" constitutes a pleonasm. The leader cult is a trait of modernity that is rarely treated as such--that is, regarding the tension it brings to the scientific rationality that modernity strives to exhibit.
I am convinced that Emerson's "rude truth" was meant by Emerson to be an evident pleonasm. I am certainly happy my note to you was not simply ignored.
But the importance of the subject matter addressed in this provocative book requires pleonasm in order to locate this important issue in the forefront of policy makers and others concerned about political stability and peaceful coexistence.
Before that, the affirmation of a distinction, perhaps needed: it concerns the divide in modernity between (if the pleonasm can be tolerated) religious religion and political religion.
For an Anglican-focused theological discussion, see John Milbank, "Pleonasm, Speech, and Writing," in The Word Made Strange: Theology, Language, Culture (Oxford: Blackwell, 1997).