pleiotropy


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Related to pleiotropy: pleiotropism, epistasis

pleiotropy

 [pli-ot´rŏ-pe]
the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects. The term is often used to refer to a single gene defect that is expressed as problems in multiple systems of the body, such as in osteogenesis imperfecta, where the gene causes defects in several different systems that contain collagen.

plei·ot·ro·py

, pleiotropia (plī-ot'rō-pē, plī-ō-trō'pē-ă),
Production by a single mutant gene of apparently unrelated multiple effects at the clinical or phenotypic level.
[pleio- + G. tropos, turning]

pleiotropy

/plei·ot·ro·py/ (-pe) the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects.pleiotrop´ic

pleiotropy

(plī-ŏt′rə-pē) also

pleiotropism

(-pĭz′əm)
n. Biology
The production of diverse effects, especially the production by a single gene of several distinct and seemingly unrelated phenotypic effects.

plei′o·tro′pic (plī′ə-trō′pĭk, -trŏp′ĭk) adj.

pleiotropy

[plī·ot′rəpē]
Etymology: Gk, pleion, more, trepein to turn
the production by a single gene of a complex of unrelated phenotypic effects. The effects may be a manifestation of a particular disorder, such as the cluster of symptoms in Marfan's syndrome; aortic aneurysm; dislocation of the optic lens; skeletal deformities; and arachnodactyly, any or all of which may be present. pleiotropic, adj.

plei·ot·ro·py

, pleiotropia (plī-ot'rŏ-pē, -ō-trō'pē-ă)
Production by a single mutant gene of apparently unrelated multiple effects at the clinical or phenotypic level.
[pleio- + G. tropos, turning]

pleiotropism, pleiotropy

the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pleiotropy in the melanocortin system, coloration, and behavioural syndromes.
Pleiotropy, natural selection, and the evolution of senescence.
with effects of pleiotropy of one gene or of multiple genes that are clustered together in the QTL region.
Moreover, if the organism has a flexibility in allocating some of its limited resources over time, then following an argument proposed in the Antagonistic Pleiotropy Theory of Williams (1957), the organism will disproportionately allocate resources to when it is young at the expense of having fewer resources when it is old.
Because these transcription factors are responsible for regulation of pleiotropy of proinflammatory mediators in many cell types, including epithelial cells, (7-10) it is likely that they contribute to epithelial cell dysfunction seen in patients with ALI/ARDS (Figure 8).
Pleiotropy, natural selection and the evolution of senescence.
Inflammaging (inflammation + aging): A driving force for human aging based on an evolutionarily antagonistic pleiotropy theory?
Among his topics are scale matters, dominance, pleiotropy, epistatis, populations and natural selection and pathworks.
Consistency in the genotypic correlation is maintained in the case of pleiotropy or common physiological basis.
The concept of antagonistic pleiotropy (68) goes a significant way into elucidating the evolutionary root cause of many present disease conditions.
Pleiotropy and the small number of genes that account for our makeup suggest that gene interactions are hugely complex, not lightly to be dabbled with.
Even considering the effects of incomplete dominance, epistasis, and pleiotropy as modifiers of genetic control, the possible phenotypes change only in degree or number of discrete possibilities.