pledget


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pledget

 [plej´et]
a small compress or tuft.

pled·get

(plej'et),
A tuft of wool, cotton, or lint.

pledget

/pled·get/ (plej´it) a small compress or tuft.

pledget

(plĕj′ĭt)
n.
A small flat absorbent pad used to medicate, protect, or absorb drainage from a wound or sore.

pledget

[plej′ət]
a small flat compress made of cotton gauze, or a tuft of cotton wool, lint, or a similar synthetic material, used to wipe the skin, absorb drainage, or clean a small surface.

pled·get

(plej'ĕt)
A small mass of cotton or cotton gauze used to absorb fluid or to apply topical medicine.

pled·get

(plej'ĕt)
A tuft of wool, cotton, or lint.

pledget (plej´ət),

n a small pellet of absorbent cotton used for accurately controlled placement of medication or base. See also cotton, absorbent.

pledget

a small compress or tuft, usually of cotton or cotton wool, cotton batting, used to apply disinfectant or medicament to the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
2) The PTFE suture was fixed at the papillary muscle head using “U-” shaped suture without pledget.
Each tested sugar solution (10 mL) was adsorbed with a pledget and placed in a plastic box (8 x 8 x 6 cm LWH).
The pancreas was carefully dissected free, cleaned of extraneous tissue, weighed, wrapped in pledget and immediately placed into liquid nitrogen.
The fastener serves as a pledget for the tissue injury created by the guiding stylet.
It has been suggested that the practice of using a 10% solution either by irrigation with a conjunctival pledget or injection subconjunctivally should be discouraged (4).
To obtain salivary cortisol measurements, the infant was allowed to suck on a dental pledget for 1 minute.
has a distinctive and proven pledget, or absorbent part, that expands radically to fit the body's shape and provide unsurpassed protection against leaks, says the spokeswoman.
17 recently reported their experience with the use of interrupted pledget edeverting mattress sutures at the proximal anastomosis, passed through the sewing cuff of the valved conduit and then through an autologous pericardial strip.
It appeared to be a pledget, commonly used during vascular grafting.
Hemorrhage was controlled using sterile pledget of dry cotton wool and pressure.
In the learning phase of the study, the subjects were introduced to the odours of amitraz, organophosphate and a control (distilled water) from labelled opaque glass bottles containing one undiluted drop of each ingredient on a cotton wool pledget.