pleasure

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plea·sure

hedonophobia.

Plea·sure

(ple'zhūr),
Max A., U.S. dentist, 1903-1965. See: Pleasure curve.

pleasure

[L. placere, to please]
The feeling of being delighted or pleased.

pleasure

Any enjoyable or agreeable emotion or sensation, to the pursuit of which most people, who are free to do so, devote their lives.
References in classic literature ?
On this occasion, Miss Pross, responding to Ladybird's pleasant face and pleasant efforts to please her, unbent exceedingly; so the dinner was very pleasant, too.
Eva wondered within herself what good the tiny Elves could do in this great place; but she soon learned, for the Fairy band went among the poor and friendless, bringing pleasant dreams to the sick and old, sweet, tender thoughts of love and gentleness to the young, strength to the weak, and patient cheerfulness to the poor and lonely.
It looked pleasant, to me--very pleasant, so long a time had elapsed since I had seen a garden of any sort.
It is not to be wondered at, therefore, that Archibald's remark about his fiancee coming to live at Cape Pleasant should give him food for thought.
It was considered very pleasant reading, but I never read more of it myself than the sentence on which I chanced to light on opening the book.
Instead of going to her pupils by way of the park and the pleasant streets adjoining, she took a roundabout route through back streets, and thus escaped Mr.
They called her the "Monthly Rose," because she had spent a month with each of the aunts, and left such pleasant memories of bloom and fragrance behind her, that all wanted the family flower back again.
Yet it is not perfect - it has indeed been called "a most pleasant jumble.
She could not help thinking, too, that it would be very pleasant to have such a friend as Gilbert to jest and chatter with and exchange ideas about books and studies and ambitions.
and pleasant also it is to know a clear token of ill or good amid all the signs that the deathless ones have given to mortal men.
Through all the spring and summertime, garlands of fresh flowers, wreathed by infant hands, rested on the stone; and, when the children came to change them lest they should wither and be pleasant to him no longer, their eyes filled with tears, and they spoke low and softly of their poor dead cousin.
Next morning when the sun was shining brightly, and the clear church bells were ringing, and sedate people in their best clothes enlivened the pathway near at hand and dotted the distant thread of road, there was a pleasant Sabbath peacefulness on everything, which it was good to feel.