plateau


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Pla·teau

(plah-tō'),
Joseph Antoine Ferdinand, Belgian physicist, 1801-1883. See: Plateau-Talbot law.

pla·teau

(plă-tō'),
A flat elevated segment of a graphic record.
[Fr.]

plateau

(plă-tō′)
1. An elevated and usually flat area; a steady and consistent fever appears as a plateau on the patient's chart of vital signs.
2. The stage in training or skill acquisition when progress occurs at a very slow or flat rate in comparison with earlier phases.

ventricular plateau

The flat portion of the record of intraventricular pressure during the end of the ejection phase of ventricular systole.
References in periodicals archive ?
The northern part of the lowland, which includes Wapusk National Park, contains the most extensive area of polygonal peat plateau bog in Canada.
A plateau is a step in the transition from tube feeding to oral feeding where a child needs to spend some extra time.
Zhang was particularly concerned about a length of track running over a section of the Tibetan plateau.
The South Staffordshire Plateau itself can be divided into major units of based upon river basins, plateaus and ridges.
In the case illustrated here (figure), the left, low-frequency A-B gap occurred as a result of not using the plateau method, and it disappeared when proper masking was applied.
As a result, some find themselves experiencing a hierarchical plateau, a point at which the likelihood of hierarchical advancement is low (Ference, Stoner, & Warren, 1977).
A performance plateau is a levelling off of growth during which productivity flattens out and results remain stagnant.
The sweepers are usually anxious when they arrive at the beautiful complex of Asia Plateau, surrounded by trees and flowers, high in the hills of Panchgani overlooking the Krishna valley.
Figure 6 is a magnetic field sweep of the quadruple-series-connected i = 2 plateau [V.
The second book by Maria Wade takes up the story toward the end of the seventeenth century, and focuses on the same bands of hunter-gatherers in eastern Nueva Vizcaya, Coahuila, and the Edwards Plateau of Texas.
The plateau itself was almost completely ignored by classical selenographers, who were dazzled by Aristarchus and fascinated by Schroter's Valley.
The Colorado Plateau is the most geographically fascinating place in the country.