plate tectonics


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

plate tectonics

the study of the movement of the large crustal plates that form the surface of the earth on the continental land masses and beneath the seas. see CONTINENTAL DRIFT.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Plate tectonics dictates how continents drift apart and come back together, says the study published in the Nature journal.
A report of the findings, published August 7 in Nature, reveals that, contrary to previous studies that say plate tectonics has operated throughout Earth's history or that it emerged only 0.7 billion years ago, plate tectonics actually evolved over the last 2.5 billion years.
Plate tectonics is Earth's vital -- and unique -- continuous recycling process that directly or indirectly controls almost every function of the planet, including atmospheric conditions, mountain building (forming of continents), natural hazards such as volcanoes and earthquakes, formation of mineral deposits and the maintenance of our oceans.
Most science teachers quickly cover convection as the mechanism driving plate tectonics and focus on teaching the structure of the Earth, the evidence for plate movement, descriptions of the types of boundaries, and the earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes associated with them.
Studies have shown in the past that plate tectonics are crucial for regulating CO2 in the atmosphere of a planet.
Only a few authors, beginning with John Nance (1988), fully agree with Fountain's (2017) contention that Alaska's earthquake helped clinch adoption of the theory of plate tectonics in 1967-68.
Lead researcher Ho-kwang Mao said, "Based on our knowledge of the chemical makeup of the slabs that are drawn into the Earth's deep interior by plate tectonics, we think 300 million tons of water could be carried down to meet iron in the core and generate massive iron dioxide rocks each year".
The Incredible Plate Tectonics Comic, The Adventures of Geo, Vol.
On Earth, mountains rise out of volcanic eruptions or are pushed upward by plate tectonics, the collision of pieces of the planet's crust.
How do you engage students in STEM when teaching difficult Earth Science concepts like plate tectonics? While most teachers fall back on the tried-and-true method of creating seismographs by tying pens to ring stands or shoe-box contraptions placed on shake tables, many of us wonder how can we get students interested in more than just earthquake detection.
His main focus is on the evolution of sedimentary basins from sedimentary facies to plate tectonics. Among his topics are the tectonic setting, Phanerozoic granites, the North China Platform in Shandong Province, the Pyeongan supergroup, the Gyeongsang arc system, Tertiary basins, and the Yellow Sea.
On the Earth, the continents effectively float (a bit like the skin on hot milk) on a mobile lower layer - this we call plate tectonics and it leads to the formation of ranges of mountains, when the island continents collide, and volcanoes.