plastron


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plas·tron

(plas'tron),
The sternum with costal cartilages attached.
[Fr. a breastplate]

plastron

(plăs′trŏn) [Fr., breastplate]
The sternum and attached cartilages.

plastron

  1. the film of air covering parts of the body in aquatic insects such as water beetles, which enables them to stay under water. The film acts as a gill since gas exchange takes place between the water and the air bubble (plastron respiration).
  2. the horny bridge connecting the sides of the carapace below the body of tortoises and turtles.

plastron

skeletal structure protecting the abdomen of chelonians.
Enlarge picture
Plastron of the tortoise. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004
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References in periodicals archive ?
There was no relationship between plastron length and clutch frequency for Texas river cooters ([[chi square].
Plastrons are adaptations of the cuticle that repel water, trap air, and allow respiration during submergence (Marx & Messner 2012).
In this second experimental condition, with uncertainty, only five valid trials where the target remained projected until the sword touched the plastron were recorded and only the trial in which the RRT reached the median value was analyzed.
Morphological structures and vertical distribution in the soil indicate facultative plastron respiration in Cryptocellus adisi (Arachnida, Ricinulei) from central Amazonia.
58) The smaller of these turtles, previously described by Strauch in 1862 as Clemmys wosnessenskyi, was portrayed in his 1862 work in a color plate depicting the plastron, carapace, and profile of the turtle.
5 million EP) of UNSM Locality Cr 168, Cherry County, Nebraska, represents a single individual and consists of a mainly complete plastron, plus carapacial remnants, and limb and limb girdle elements (Holman 2002, figs.
Without a shell, their leathery, oil-saturated skin and underlying plastron enable them to dive over a half a mile deep and still withstand the intense pressures of the deep ocean.
In box turtles, the bottom shell, or plastron, is hinged so that it can close tightly against the carapace.
Even though it didn't have a hinged plastron, that belly plate that, on box turtles, swings upward to protect their heads, the turtle's head and legs were tucked under its carapace, well out of harm's way.
Snapping turtles have long tails and a plastron that is greatly reduced to form a cross-shaped ventral plastron.
Briefly, the plastron was removed and the gonads were examined under a dissection microscope.