plastid


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plastid

 [plas´tid]
1. any elementary constructive unit, as a cell.
2. any specialized organ of the cell other than the nucleus and centrosome, such as chloroplast or amyloplast.

plas·tid

(plas'tid),
1. One of the differentiated structures in cytoplasm of plant cells where photosynthesis or other cellular processes take place; plasid contain DNA and are self-replicating. Synonym(s): trophoplast
2. One of the granules of foreign or differentiated matter, food particles, fat, waste material, chromatophores, trichocysts, etc., in cells.
3. A self-duplicating viruslike particle that multiplies within a host cell, such as κ particles in certain paramecia.
[G. plastos, formed, + -id]

plastid

(plăs′tĭd)
n.
Any of several cytoplasmic organelles, such as chloroplasts, that contain genetic material, have a double membrane, and are often pigmented. Plastids are found in plants, algae, and certain other eukaryotic organisms and have various physiological functions, such as the synthesis and storage of food.

plas·tid′i·al (plăs-tĭd′ē-əl) adj.

plas·tid

(plas'tid)
1. One of the differentiated structures in cytoplasm of plant cells where photosynthesis or other cellular processes are carried on; contain DNA and are self replicating.
Synonym(s): trophoplast.
2. One of the granules of foreign or differentiated matter in cells: food particles, fat, waste material, chromatophores, and trichocysts.
3. A self-duplicating viruslike particle that multiplies within a host cell (e.g., kappa particles in certain paramecia).
[G. plastos, formed, + -id]

plastid

an organelle of plant cells, with a double membrane. Plastids are large (between 3 and 6 μ m in diameter) and have various roles, e.g. a photosynthetic function (CHLOROPLAST) or a storage function (AMYLOPLAST).
References in periodicals archive ?
From algae to angiosperms-inferring the phylogeny of green plants (Viridiplantae) from 360 plastid genomes.
For admixed wild and cultivated forms, we noted the occurrence of the three plastid lineages with a high proportion of E1 for cultivated olive (86.0%), whereas for admixed wild olive, close proportions of E1 and E2 were observed (53.1% and 44.9%, respectively, Table 2).
Merckx, "Plastomes on the edge: the evolutionary breakdown of mycoheterotroph plastid genomes," New Phytologist, vol.
Circumscription and phylogeny of the fern family Tectariaceae based on plastid and nuclear markers, with the description of two new genera: Draconopteris and Malaifilix (Tectariaceae).
Reaching a compromise between conflicting nuclear and plastid phylogenetic trees: a new classification for the genus Cattleya: Epidendreae; Epidendroideae; Orchidaceae.
Sequencing of ITS4, NIA-3 and plastid marker data showed that these two species could not be separated at sequence level (Yi et al., 2008).
Ninety-six common Thai medicinal plants were selected as a basis for primer design, and sequences for selected plastid regions (matK, rbcl, rpoC 1 and trnL) were retrieved from the GenBank (NCBI, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) for each of the species (Supplementary Data 1).
Kuntz, "Subfamily organization and phylogenetic origin of genes encoding plastid lipid-associated proteins of the fibrillin type," Journal of Genome Science and Technology, vol.
In the last two decades, the nucleotide sequences of large number of plastid genomes have been published leading to better understanding of their organization and evolution [2,11,12].
Hsp60 is important in the assembly of plastid proteins such as Rubisco [49, 50].
The plastid ndh genes encode components of the thylakoid Ndh complex, which is analogous to the NADH dehydrogenase or complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADH to plastoquinone [32,6,28].