plastid


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plastid

 [plas´tid]
1. any elementary constructive unit, as a cell.
2. any specialized organ of the cell other than the nucleus and centrosome, such as chloroplast or amyloplast.

plas·tid

(plas'tid),
1. One of the differentiated structures in cytoplasm of plant cells where photosynthesis or other cellular processes take place; plasid contain DNA and are self-replicating. Synonym(s): trophoplast
2. One of the granules of foreign or differentiated matter, food particles, fat, waste material, chromatophores, trichocysts, etc., in cells.
3. A self-duplicating viruslike particle that multiplies within a host cell, such as κ particles in certain paramecia.
[G. plastos, formed, + -id]

plastid

(plăs′tĭd)
n.
Any of several cytoplasmic organelles, such as chloroplasts, that contain genetic material, have a double membrane, and are often pigmented. Plastids are found in plants, algae, and certain other eukaryotic organisms and have various physiological functions, such as the synthesis and storage of food.

plas·tid′i·al (plăs-tĭd′ē-əl) adj.

plas·tid

(plas'tid)
1. One of the differentiated structures in cytoplasm of plant cells where photosynthesis or other cellular processes are carried on; contain DNA and are self replicating.
Synonym(s): trophoplast.
2. One of the granules of foreign or differentiated matter in cells: food particles, fat, waste material, chromatophores, and trichocysts.
3. A self-duplicating viruslike particle that multiplies within a host cell (e.g., kappa particles in certain paramecia).
[G. plastos, formed, + -id]

plastid

an organelle of plant cells, with a double membrane. Plastids are large (between 3 and 6 μ m in diameter) and have various roles, e.g. a photosynthetic function (CHLOROPLAST) or a storage function (AMYLOPLAST).

plastid

1. any elementary constructive unit, as a cell.
2. any specialized organ of the cell other than the nucleus and centrosome, such as chloroplast, mitochondria or amyloplast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Support for this clade is not very strong, however, and plastid data place it as a separate lineage from Mackinlayoideae, sister to the rest of Apiaceae (i.
Analysis of plastid DNA-like sequences within the nuclear genomes of higher plants.
The episomal marker is located within the ORF 470 of the 35-kb plastid (11), which is physically unlinked to genomic markers.
Pollen transmission of plastid DNA under genotypic control in Petunia hybrida Hort.
The cell cycle is composed of a mitotic cycle, a mitochondrial division cycle, and a plastid cycle, which could be synchronized by light/dark cycles.
Reaching a compromise between conflicting nuclear and plastid phylogenetic trees: a new classification for the genus Cattleya: Epidendreae; Epidendroideae; Orchidaceae.
Sequencing of ITS4, NIA-3 and plastid marker data showed that these two species could not be separated at sequence level (Yi et al.
Ninety-six common Thai medicinal plants were selected as a basis for primer design, and sequences for selected plastid regions (matK, rbcl, rpoC 1 and trnL) were retrieved from the GenBank (NCBI, http://www.
Phylogenetic studies in section Petota, including plastid DNA
A plastid DNA phylogeny of Dasymaschalon (Annonaceae) and allied genera: Evidence for generic non-monophyly and the parallel evolutionary loss of inner petals.
Plastid trnL intron polymorphisms among Phalaenopsis species used for identifying the plastid genome type of Phalaenopsis hybrids.
The plastid ndh genes encode components of the thylakoid Ndh complex, which is analogous to the NADH dehydrogenase or complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADH to plastoquinone [32,6,28].