plaster

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plaster

 [plas´ter]
1. a mixture of materials that hardens; used for immobilizing or making impressions of body parts.
2. an adhesive substance spread on fabric or other suitable backing material, for application to the skin, often containing some medication, such as an analgesic or local vasodilator.
plaster of Paris calcium sulfate dihydrate, reduced to a fine powder; the addition of water produces a porous mass used in making casts and bandages to support or immobilize body parts, and in dentistry for making study models.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr),
1. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and that becomes adhesive at the temperature of the body; used to keep the edges of a wound in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, and, when medicated, to redden or blister the skin, as in mustard plaster, or to apply drugs to the surface to obtain their systemic effects.
2. In dentistry, colloquialism for plaster of Paris.
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

plaster

(plăs′tər)
n.
1. Plaster of Paris.
2. A pastelike mixture applied to a part of the body for healing or cosmetic purposes.
3. Chiefly British An adhesive bandage.
v. plas·tered, plas·tering, plas·ters
v.tr.
To apply a plaster to: plaster an aching muscle.
v.intr.
To apply plaster.

plas′ter·er n.
plas′ter·y adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr)
1. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and becomes adhesive at the temperature of the body; used to keep the edges of a wound in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, or to apply medicine topically for local or systemic effects.
2. dentistry A type of gypsum containing calcium sulfate hemihydrate and porous crystals that require more water during mixing than other such products; used in preparing study models (nonworking casts).
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

plas·ter

(plas'tĕr)
1. In dentistry, general term for calcined gypsum products used to fabricate dental casts and products used to attach casts to articulators. Principal constituent is calcium sulfate hemihydrate.
2. A solid preparation that can be spread when heated and becomes adhesive at body temperature; used to keep wound edges in apposition, to protect raw surfaces, and, when medicated, to redden or blister skin, as in mustard plaster, or to apply drugs to the surface to obtain their systemic effects.
[L. emplastrum; G. emplastron, plaster or mold]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Why any burglar should take such a thing passes my understanding, for it was only a plaster cast and of no real value whatever.
The cast was taken in two moulds from each side of the face, and then these two profiles of plaster of Paris were joined together to make the complete bust.
This old house with the leaky weatherboards was a very different thing from their cabins at home, with great thick walls plastered inside and outside with mud; and the cold which came upon them was a living thing, a demon-presence in the room.
Kate Middleton always wears plasters on her hand for an absurd reason.
* Historic and forecast market values for the plaster and lime products market and its categories (plasterboard, plasters, gypsum and lime products) for the period 2009 through to 2018
This can generate high levels of humidity which, combined with higher temperatures, can affect older lime-based plasters. In particular, it can affect the adhesion between layers of plaster or between the plaster and the solid brick wall.
Modern plasters now offer compressive strengths from 3,000 to 10,000 psi.
The term plaster, when it comes to wall systems, focuses on gypsum-based plasters.
A good, robust design in four sizes, including two large knee plasters. The standard-size finger plasters were a bit short to be man-size, but survived 24 hours without becoming loose or grimy.
Without having to build a straw bale house or a mud hut, you can experience the beauties and benefits of earthen (clay-based) plasters by doing a bit of eco-remodeling in the house you live in right now.
You can buy easy-to-use fine fillers, but if you need to make good a thick coating you can use the traditional undercoat and top-coat plasters or a one-coat plaster.