plaster of Paris


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

plaster

 [plas´ter]
1. a mixture of materials that hardens; used for immobilizing or making impressions of body parts.
2. an adhesive substance spread on fabric or other suitable backing material, for application to the skin, often containing some medication, such as an analgesic or local vasodilator.
plaster of Paris calcium sulfate dihydrate, reduced to a fine powder; the addition of water produces a porous mass used in making casts and bandages to support or immobilize body parts, and in dentistry for making study models.

plas·'ter of Par·is

exsiccated calcium sulfate from which the water of crystallization has been expelled by heat, but which, when mixed with water, will form a paste that subsequently sets.

plaster of Paris

n.
Any of a group of gypsum cements, essentially hemihydrated calcium sulfate, CaSO4· 1/2 H2O, a white powder that forms a paste when it is mixed with water and then hardens into a solid, used in making casts, molds, and sculpture.

plas·ter of Par·is

(plas'tĕr par'is)
Any of a group of gypsum cements, essentially hemihydrated calcium sulfate, a white powder that forms a paste when mixed with water and then hardens into a solid; used in making casts, molds, and sculpture.
[L. plastrum, plaster + Paris, France]

plaster of Paris

A white powder of dried calcium sulphate dihydrate which, mixed with water, gives off heat and hardens. Reinforced with loose bandage it forms a strong and useful support (CAST) or dental mould.

Paris,

city in France.
plaster of Paris - a gypsum material used for making casts.

plas·ter of Par·is

(plas'tĕr par'is)
Exsiccated calcium sulfate from which water of crystallization has been expelled by heat, but which, when mixed with water, forms a paste that then sets.
[L. plastrum, plaster + Paris, France]
References in periodicals archive ?
So, it can be drawn that when the OPC was added to plaster of Paris, an opposite strength development trend was exhibited between R-CP and POCP, and the strength decrease rate of R-CP was also much higher than that of R-CP-0:
Mix up plaster of Paris and pour it on top of clay.
The casts are made of plaster of Paris; the master moulds are made of rubber and are used for two or three years.
Next, a rigid polyethylene mask is made from the plaster of Paris cast.
"I've got stitches under my eye and a plaster across my nose - it's all packed with plaster of Paris.
Then she mixed about two gallons of ordinary plaster of Paris in a plastic bucket on the floor by the head of the massage table, working it with her hands to a marshmallow consistency.
It was made of Plaster of Paris there was rubber and then two layers of Plaster of Paris.
A Leyla-Yasargil retractor, an ear speculum, an ear speculum holder, and some plaster of Paris or dental molding material are required (figure 1).
American Standard said it had invested in pressure casting equipment, which meant it no longer needed to employ people to make its traditional plaster of Paris moulds.
Although the vet put plaster of paris on the bone to see if it would set, a few weeks later, when the plaster came off, it was clear the break had not healed and the calf had to be put down.
In this activity, you can make your own sandstone using sediments (sand and soil) and glue (plaster of Paris).
Most of the images obtained are for hydrating portland cement pastes, with a few data sets representing hydrating Plaster of Paris and a common building brick.