plasminogen activator inhibitor


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inhibitor

 [in-hib´ĭ-tor]
1. any substance that interferes with a chemical reaction, growth, or other biologic activity.
2. a chemical substance that inhibits or checks the action of a tissue organizer or the growth of microorganisms.
3. an effector that reduces the catalytic activity of an enzyme.
ACE i's (angiotensin-converting enzyme i's) see angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.
angiogenesis inhibitor a group of drugs that prevent growth of new blood vessels into a solid tumor.
aromatase i's a class of drugs that inhibit aromatase activity and thus block production of estrogens; used to treat breast cancer and endometriosis.
C1 inhibitor (C1 INH) a member of the serpin group, an inhibitor of C1, the initial component activated in the classical complement pathway. Deficiency of or defect in the protein causes hereditary angioedema.
carbonic anhydrase inhibitor an agent that inhibits the enzyme carbonic anhydrase; used in treatment of glaucoma and sometimes for epilepsy, familial periodic paralysis, acute mountain sickness, and kidney stones of uric acid.
cholinesterase inhibitor anticholinesterase.
COX-2 i's (cyclooxygenase-2 i's) a group of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs that act by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2 activity; they have fewer gastrointestinal side effects than other NSAIDs. Two members of the group are celecoxib and rofecoxib.
gastric acid pump inhibitor an agent that inhibits gastric acid secretion by blocking the action of H+,K+-ATPase at the secretory surface of gastric parietal cells; called also proton pump i.
HIV protease inhibitor any of a group of antiretroviral drugs active against the human immunodeficiency virus; they prevent protease-mediated cleavage of viral polyproteins, causing production of immature viral particles that are noninfective. Examples include indinavir sulfate, nelfinavir mesylate, ritonavir, and saquinavir.
HMG-CoA reductase i's a group of drugs that competitively inhibit the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and are used to lower plasma lipoprotein levels in the treatment of hyperlipoproteinemia. Called also statins.
membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (MIRL) protectin.
monoamine oxidase inhibitor any of a group of drugs that inhibit the action of monoamine oxidase, the enzyme that breaks down norepinephrine and serotonin, prescribed for their antidepressant action; the most widely used ones are isocarboxazid, phenelzine, and tranylcypromine. They are also used in the prevention of migraine.
α2-plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin.
plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) any of several regulators of the fibrinolytic system that act by binding to and inhibiting free plasminogen activator. Their concentration in plasma is normally low, but is altered in some disturbances of bodily hemostasis. PAI-1 is an important fast-reacting inhibitor of t-plasminogen activator and u-plasminogen activator. Its synthesis, activity, and release are highly regulated; elevated levels of it have been described in a number of disease states. PAI-2 is a normally minor inhibitor that greatly increases in concentration during pregnancy and in certain disorders. PAI-3 is protein C inhibitor.
platelet inhibitor any of a group of agents that inhibit the clotting activity of platelets; the most common ones are aspirin and dipyridamole. See also antiplatelet therapy.
protease inhibitor
1. a substance that blocks activity of endopeptidase (protease), such as in a virus.
protein C inhibitor the primary inhibitor of activated anticoagulant protein C; it is a glycoprotein of the serpin family of proteinase inhibitors and also inhibits several other proteins involved in coagulation (thrombin, kallikrein, and coagulation factors X and XI) and urokinase. Called also plasminogen activator inhibitor 3.
proton pump inhibitor gastric acid pump i.
reverse transcriptase inhibitor a substance that blocks activity of the reverse transcriptase of a retrovirus and is used as an antiretroviral agent. Some are nucleosides or nucleoside analogues, and those that are not are therefore often called non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.
selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) any of a group of drugs that inhibit the inactivation of serotonin by blocking its absorption in the central nervous system; used as antidepressants and in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic disorder.
serine protease inhibitor (serine proteinase inhibitor) serpin.
topoisomerase i's a class of antineoplastic agents that interfere with the arrangement of DNA in cells.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

plasminogen activator inhibitor

plasma protein active in thrombus turnover; along with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and lipoprotein Lp(a), was found to be increased in patients with angiographically verified coronary artery disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

plas·min·ogen ac·tiv·a·tor in·hi·bi·tor

(PAI) (plaz-minŏ-jen akti-vā-tŏr in-hibi-tŏr)
Plasma protein active in thrombus turnover; with tissue plasminogen activator and lipoprotein, was found to increase in patients with angiographically verified coronary artery disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) for prognosis in endometrial cancer.
(36.) Cancelas JA, Garcia-Avello A, Garcia-Frade LJ: High plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are associated with thrombosis.
Gebara of the Harvard Medical School in Boston and his colleagues focused on a substance in the blood called plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI).
Vaughan, "Pentoxifylline lowers plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels in obese individuals: a pilot study," Angiology, vol.
Schmitt, "Clinical relevance of invasion factors urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 for individualized therapy decisions in primary breast cancer is greatest when used in combination," Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol.
[3] Nonstandard abbreviations: TF, tissue factor; FVIIa, activated factor VII; TM, thrombomodulin; PC, protein C; EPCR, endothelial protein C receptor; APC, activated PC; PS, protein S; AT, antithrombin; TFPI, tissue factor pathway inhibitor; tPA, tissue plasminogen activator; uPA, urokinase plasminogen activator; PAI, plasminogen activator inhibitor; PI, plasmin inhibitor; TAFI, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor; ROTEM/TEG, thromboelastometry/thromboelastography; T2MR, T2 magnetic resonance.
Two years later, a 36-year-old patient with undetectable plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) antigen and activity was reported.
Editor's Note: Additionally, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) was reduced, reflecting a reduction in the risk of excessive blood clotting, while adiponectin and interleukin 10 were increased in the group that received grape extract with resveratrol.
Initially, several cross-sectional studies of patients with angina pectoris or previous myocardial infarction suggested that such patients had an impaired fibrinolytic system, and subsequently a few prospective cohort studies supported the notion that fibrinolytic factors such as plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) mass concentrations were predictors of future events in this type of patients.7
These changes included: Increase in blood levels of interleukin 1beta, a signature marker of inflammation that appears to play a key role in heart disease, decrease in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and plasminogen, components that play an important role in dissolving blood clots that may form along arterial walls and a change in heart rhythm, indicating altered autonomic nervous system control of heart rate.
Vlachopoulos and colleagues showed that men with ED but without coronary artery disease have significant increases in numerous inflammatory markers (e.g., hsCRP, interleukin 6 [IL-6], interleukin-1 beta [IL-1], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-a]), prothrombotic markers, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, tissue plasminogen activator [tPA], and fibrinogen.

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