still layer

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still lay·er

the layer of the bloodstream in the capillary vessels, next to the wall of the vessel, that flows slowly and transports the white blood cells along the layer wall, whereas in the center the flow is rapid and transports the red blood cells.

still lay·er

(stil lā'ĕr)
The layer of the bloodstream in the capillary vessels, next to the wall of the vessel, which flows slowly and transports the white blood cells along the layer wall, whereas in the center the flow is rapid and transports the red blood cells.
Synonym(s): Poiseuille space.

Poiseuille,

Jean Léonard Marie, French physiologist and physicist, 1797-1869.
poise - the unit of viscosity equal to 1 dyne-second per square centimeter and to 0.1 pascal-second.
Poiseuille equation
Poiseuille law - describes the volume flow rate of a liquid through a tube.
Poiseuille space - Synonym(s): still layer
Poiseuille viscosity coefficient - an expression of the viscosity as determined by the capillary tube method.
References in periodicals archive ?
2]Cr in the zone adjacent to the plasma layer (Figure 2, c) can be explained.
However, when conditions are right, bubbles of low-density plasma penetrate the dense plasma layer and rise high above Earth.
Be sure to dilute the buffy coat and plasma layer with sufficient isotonic saline for adequate cell morphology.
The top plasma layer was aspirated to within 1 mL to 2 mL of the mononuclear cell layer, and the white cell layer was subsequently transferred into a clear tube.
Coblation uses RF energy to excite the electrolytes in a conductive medium, such as saline, creating a precisely focused plasma layer.
When electrical current is applied to this fluid, it transforms into a plasma layer of charged particles.
This could be explained by a phenomenon that can be triggered in a differentially rotating plasma in the presence of magnetic fields: neighboring plasma layers, which rotate at different speeds, "rub against each other," eventually setting the plasma into turbulent motion.
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