plasma cell myeloma


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myeloma

 [mi″ĕ-lo´mah]
1. a tumor composed of plasma cells of the type normally found in the bone marrow.
giant cell myeloma giant cell tumor (def. 1).
multiple myeloma see multiple myeloma.
plasma cell myeloma multiple myeloma.
solitary myeloma a variant of multiple myeloma in which there is a single localized tumor focus. Called also plasma cell tumor.

plas·ma cell my·e·lo·ma

1. Synonym(s): multiple myeloma
2. plasmacytoma of bone, which is usually a solitary lesion and not associated with the occurrence of Bence Jones protein or other disturbances in the metabolism of protein (as observed in multiple myeloma). Some observers emphasize that the solitary lesion probably represents an early phase of classic multiple myeloma, or an example of the latter in which only one focus is recognized.

plasma cell myeloma

plas·ma cell my·e·lo·ma

(plazmă sel mīĕ-lōmă)
1. Synonym(s): multiple myeloma.
2. Plasmacytoma of bone, which is usually a solitary lesion and not associated with the occurrence of Bence Jones protein or other disturbances in the metabolism of protein (as observed in multiple myeloma).

plas·ma cell my·e·lo·ma

(plazmă sel mīĕ-lōmă)
1. Synonym(s): multiple myeloma.
2. Plasmacytoma of bone, which is usually a solitary lesion and not associated with the occurrence of Bence Jones protein or other disturbances in the metabolism of protein.

myeloma

1. a B lymphocyte tumor.
2. multiple myeloma.

giant cell myeloma
giant cell tumor (1).
multiple myeloma
a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells, in which the plasma cells proliferate and invade the bone marrow, causing destruction of the bone and resulting in pathological fracture and bone pain. A secretory form of the disease is characterized by the presence of an immunoglobulin recognized as Bence Jones protein (monoclonal immunoglobulin), Bence Jones proteinuria, anemia, and lowered resistance to infection. It is the most common type of monoclonal gammopathy. A non-secretory form of the disease also occurs.
osteosclerotic myeloma
multiple myeloma associated with osteosclerosis (rather than bone destruction) and often with peripheral neuropathy.
plasma cell myeloma
see multiple myeloma (above).
myeloma protein
the immunoglobulin molecules produced by myeloma cells. See gammopathy.

plasma

the fluid portion of the blood in which corpuscles are suspended. Plasma is to be distinguished from serum, which is plasma from which the fibrinogen has been separated in the process of clotting.

plasma bound
many electrolytes exist in plasma in a form in which they are bound to protein which reduces their lability and liability to loss in the urine, e.g. protein-bound iodine.
plasma cell gingitivitis-pharyngitis
see feline plasma cell gingivitis-pharyngitis.
plasma cell myeloma
see multiple myeloma.
plasma cell pododermatitis
a nonpainful swelling with ulceration and exuberant granulation tissue on the footpads of cats. The cause is unknown but believed to be immunological.
Enlarge picture
Plasma cell pododermatitis in a cat.
plasma clearing factor
a lipoprotein lipase which lipolyses the triglyceride in the chylomicrons of the plasma and hence clears it of cloudiness.
plasma exchange
the removal of plasma from withdrawn blood (plasmapheresis) and retransfusion of the formed elements and type-specific fresh-frozen plasma into the donor; done for removal of circulating antibodies or abnormal plasma components.
plasma expanders
see plasma volume expander.
fresh-frozen plasma
prepared from whole blood; a source of coagulation factors.
plasma protein
the heterologous group of proteins in circulating blood that includes albumin, lipoproteins, glycoproteins, transcortin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, cholinesterase, α2-macroglobulin, erythropoietin, transferrin, hemopexin, fibrinogen, plasminogen and the immunoglobulins (γ-globulins).
plasma protein:fibrinogen (PP:F) ratio
an indicator of significant changes in fibrinogen levels, taking into account dehydration.
plasma substitute
a fluid suitable for use as a replacement for plasma in the animal body. Usually a solution of gelatin or dextran.
therapeutic plasma concentration
a therapy-response relationship determined only by experiment; the plasma level which is matched by the desired therapeutic response.
plasma thromboplastin antecedent
clotting factor XI; see plasma thromboplastin antecedent.
plasma turbidity test
a qualitative test for fat absorption, performed by comparing the turbidity of plasma before and 2, 3 and 4 hours after the oral administration of fats, usually vegetable oil. Results are greatly influenced by delays in gastric emptying, so normally this test can only be relied upon to rule out malabsorption or maldigestion when evidence of absorption is found.
plasma volume
the estimation of plasma volume is essential to a complete knowledge of a patient's fluid status. The common technique is by the intravenous injection of a known amount of a dye such as Evans blue and the subsequent measurement of the dilution that it has undergone in a set time period.

Patient discussion about plasma cell myeloma

Q. Multiple Myeloma what and how is it treated and what is MGUF

A. Were you referring by any chance to MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance)? It's a condition that resembles myeloma but is much more widespread and by itself isn't considered malignant. It may, however, deteriorate to multiple myeloma over the years.

Myeloma is treated with chemotherapy of various kinds, and sometimes with bone marrow transplantation with the patients own bone marrow.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/multiplemyeloma.html

More discussions about plasma cell myeloma
References in periodicals archive ?
Peripheral Blood Findings at the Time of Bone Marrow Examination Showing Concomitant Plasma Cell Myeloma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)/Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis Case Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, Mean No.
CD56 and cyclin D1 were negative in all cases examined, distinguishing PBL from plasma cell myeloma.
23) To confirm the correlation between Notch1 activation and expression of mTOR pathways components, we examined expression of Notch1, 4E-BP1, and rpS6 expression in 5 cases of PEL and 21 cases of plasma cell myeloma (Table 2).
In this study we confirm the increasingly recognized fact (1-5) that PBLs, like PEL, plasma cell myeloma, and cHL, exhibit marked decreases in the expression of B-cell-lineage markers, such as CD19, CD20, CD79a, and PAX5.
This is supported by the finding that these mTOR targets are also expressed in PEL and plasma cell myeloma, both of which exhibit increased Notch signaling.
19) In contrast, Notch1 activation in plasma cell myeloma appears to be driven by interaction with Jagged-1.
A poor prognostic marker for plasma cell myeloma includes the expression of CD10 (CALLA).
Plasma cell myeloma with cleaved, multilobated, and monocytoid nuclei.
Multilobated plasma cell myelomas tend to present at a more advanced stage and have a more aggressive course.

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