serum albumin

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Related to plasma albumin: serum albumin, blood albumin

albumin

 [al-bu´min]
1. any protein that is soluble in water and moderately concentrated salt solutions and is coagulable by heat.
2. serum albumin; the most abundant plasma protein, formed principally in the liver and constituting up to two thirds of the 6 to 8 per cent protein concentration in the plasma. (See accompanying table.) Albumin is responsible for much of the colloidal osmotic pressure of the blood, and thus is a very important factor in regulating the exchange of water between the plasma and the interstitial compartment (space between the cells). Because of hydrostatic pressure, water is forced through the walls of the capillaries into the tissue spaces. This flow of water continues until the osmotic pull of protein (albumin) molecules causes it to stop. A drop in the amount of albumin in the plasma leads to an increase in the flow of water from the capillaries into the interstitial compartment. This results in an increase in tissue fluid which, if severe, becomes apparent as edema. Albumin serves also as a transport protein carrying large organic anions, such as fatty acids, bilirubin, and many drugs, and also hormones, such as cortisol and thyroxine, when their specific binding globulins are saturated.

The presence of albumin in the urine (albuminuria) indicates malfunction of the kidney, and may accompany kidney disease or heart failure. A person with severe renal disease may lose as much as 20 to 30 g of plasma proteins in the urine in one day.

A decrease in the serum albumin level may occur with severe disease of the kidney. Other conditions such as liver disease, malnutrition, and extensive burns may result in serious decrease of plasma proteins.
albumin-globulin ratio the ratio of albumin to globulin in blood serum, plasma, or urine.
albumin human a preparation of human serum albumin, used as an artificial plasma extender and to increase bilirubin binding in hyperbilirubinemia.
iodinated I 125 albumin a radiopharmaceutical used in blood and plasma volume, circulation time, and cardiac output determinations, consisting of albumin human labeled with iodine-125.
iodinated I 131 albumin a radiopharmaceutical used in blood pool imaging and plasma volume determinations, consisting of albumin human labeled with iodine-131.
normal human serum albumin albumin human.
serum albumin albumin of the blood.

se·rum al·bu·min

the principal protein in plasma, present in blood plasma and in serous fluids. Participates in fatty acid transport and helps regulate the osmotic pressure of blood. It will also bind hormones, bilirubin, and drugs.

serum albumin

n.
The main serum protein of the blood in humans and other vertebrates, produced in the liver and active in the maintenance of blood osmotic pressure, and in the transport of fatty acids, steroids, and other compounds, including many drugs.

serum albumin

a major protein in blood plasma. It is important in maintaining the osmotic pressure of the blood. Normal value is 3.5 to 5.0 g/dL.

ALB

A gene on chromosome 4q13.3 that encodes albumin, the soluble, monomeric protein that comprises the protein in the serum. It serves as a carrier protein for steroids, fatty acids and thyroid hormones; binds well to water, Ca2+, Na2+, K+, fatty acids, hormones, bilirubin and certain drugs; and plays a central role in stabilising extracellular fluid volume. It is produced in the liver as preproalbumin and partially cleaved before its release from the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

Molecular pathology
ALB mutations cause familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinaemia.

se·rum al·bu·min

(sēr'ŭm al-bū'min)
The principal protein in plasma, present in blood plasma and in serous fluids. Participates in fatty acid transport and helps regulate the osmotic pressure of blood.
Synonym(s): blood albumin, seralbumin.

serum albumin

One of the soluble protein fractions of blood serum. Albumin is important in maintaining the OSMOTIC PRESSURE of the blood.

albumin

1. any protein that is soluble in water and moderately concentrated salt solutions and is coagulable by heat.
2. serum albumin; a plasma protein, formed principally in the liver and constituting about four-sevenths of the 6 to 8% protein concentration in the plasma. Albumin is responsible for much of the colloidal osmotic pressure of the blood, and thus is a very important factor in regulating the exchange of water between the plasma and the interstitial compartment (space between the cells).
The presence of albumin in the urine (see albuminuria) indicates malfunction of the kidney, and may accompany kidney disease or heart failure.
A decrease in the serum albumin level may occur with severe disease of the kidney. Other conditions such as liver disease, malnutrition and extensive burns may result in serious decrease of plasma proteins.

aggregated albumin
heat-denatured human albumin, which is labeled with radioisotopes for pulmonary perfusion scanning. Called also macroaggregated albumin. See also technetium.
51Cr-labeled albumin excretion
a method of determining gastrointestinal protein loss. After intravenous administration of 51Cr-labeled albumin, radioactivity in the feces is measured.
albumin-globulin (A/G) ratio
the ratio of albumin to globulin in blood serum, plasma or urine.
iodinated 125I albumin
a radiopharmaceutical used in plasma volume determinations, consisting of albumin human labeled with iodine-125.
iodinated 131I albumin
a radiopharmaceutical used in blood pool imaging and plasma volume determinations, consisting of albumin human labeled with iodine-131.
macroaggregated albumin (MAA)
aggregated albumin.
serum albumin
albumin of the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
51 (a) Modified albumins were all prepared from purified plasma albumin.
Table 2 shows that the ingestion of TJ-15 decreased the plasma total protein and increased the plasma albumin level significantly within 120 min.
In the present study, the plasma albumin level and A/G ratio increased, and plasma total protein concentration decreased significantly.
Bromcresol green assay is nonspecific for rat plasma albumin.
Determination of plasma albumin concentration in healthy and diseased turtles: a comparison of protein electrophoresis and the bromcresol green dye-binding method.
All of these data are consistent with the smaller interassay difference observed in the outpatient groups characterized by relatively higher PCVs and plasma albumin concentrations (Table 2 of the online Data Supplement).
In patients with normal or near-normal PCV and plasma albumin concentrations within the reference interval, the customary small difference between the results (<7%) is unlikely to affect clinical management.
Plasma albumin and vitamin concentrations and body mass index were within the appropriate reference intervals, thus allowing the exclusion of protein energy malnutrition as a source of HHcy.
Plasma albumin and albumin in the supernatant were measured by immunoprecipitation (BNA-Behring).
Plasma albumin (measured by bromcresol green on the Paramax RX analyzer) also decreased linearly with increasing concentrations of NaF, confirming that the change in hematocrit was not artifactual (Table 1).
Differences in electrophoresis patterns between plasma albumins of the cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) and the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).