plaque

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Related to plaque assay: hemolytic plaque assay

plaque

 [plak]
1. any patch or flat area.
2. a superficial, solid, elevated skin lesion with a diameter equal to or greater than 1.0 cm (0.5 cm according to some authorities); see also papule.
atheromatous plaque fibrous plaque.
dental plaque a dense, nonmineralized, highly organized biofilm of microbes, organic and inorganic material derived from the saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and bacterial byproducts. It plays an important etiologic role in the development of dental caries and periodontal and gingival diseases; calcified plaque forms dental calculus.
fibrous plaque the lesion of atherosclerosis, a white to yellow area within the wall of an artery that causes the intimal surface to bulge into the lumen; it is composed of lipid, cell debris, smooth muscle cells, collagen, and, in older persons, calcium. Called also atheromatous plaque.
Hollenhorst p's atheromatous emboli containing cholesterol crystals in the retinal arterioles.
pleural p's opaque white plaques on the parietal pleura, visible radiographically in cases of asbestosis.
senile p's microscopic lesions composed of fragmented axon terminals and dendrites surrounding a core of amyloid seen in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

plaque

(plak),
1. A patch or small differentiated area on a body surface (for example, skin, mucosa, or arterial endothelium) or on the cut surface of an organ such as the brain; in skin, a circumscribed, elevated, superficial, and solid area exceeding 1 cm in diameter.
2. An area of clearing in a flat confluent growth of bacteria or tissue cells, such as that caused by the lytic action of bacteriophage in an agar plate culture of bacteria, by the cytopathic effect of certain animal viruses in a sheet of cultured tissue cells, or by antibody (hemolysin) produced by lymphocytes cultured in the presence of erythrocytes and to which complement has been added.
3. A sharply defined zone of demyelination characteristic of multiple sclerosis.
4.
[Fr. a plate]

plaque

(plăk)
n.
1. A scaly patch on a body part, especially the skin.
2. A biofilm of bacteria in a matrix of polysaccharides and other substances on the surface of a tooth or teeth.
3.
a. A deposit of fatty material on the inner lining of an arterial wall, characteristic of atherosclerosis.
b. The material that such a deposit is composed of.
4. A deposit consisting mainly of beta-amyloid and degenerating nerve tissue, found in the brain tissue of people with Alzheimer's disease.
5. A sharply defined zone of demyelination in the central nervous system characteristic of multiple sclerosis.
6. A clear, often round patch of lysed cells in an otherwise opaque layer of a bacteria or cell culture.

plaque

Cardiology
An early lesion of atherosclerosis which may be found in persons of any age in large vessels.
 
Dentistry
A soft sticky substance on teeth composed of bacteria and saliva; an indurated soft mass of polysaccharides and bacteria—e.g., Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus mutans.

Dermatology
A flat, solid, elevated, ≥ 1.0-cm-diameter skin nodule formed either by extension or coalescence of papules of lichen amyloidosis, lichen simplex chronicus, lichen planus, or psoriasis; a “plaque” stage occurs in certain skin tumours (e.g., the second stage of Kaposi sarcoma), and evolving mycosis fungoides.
 
Molecular biology
A clear area on a lawn of bacterial cells caused by the lysis of infected cells by a phage.
 
Neuropathology
Shadow plaques—one of multiple, irregularly shaped and sharply demarcated lesions (focal demyelinisation) in the gray and white matter in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis.

plaque

Cardiology An early lesion of ASHD found in persons of any age in larger vessels Dentistry A soft sticky substance on teeth composed of bacteria and saliva; an indurated gob of polysaccharides and bacteria–eg, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus mutans. See Periodontitis Dermatology A flat, solid, elevated ≥ 1. 0 cm in diameter skin nodule formed either by extension or coalescence of papules of lichen amyloidosis, lichen simplex chronicus, lichen planus, psoriasis; a 'plaque' stage occurs in certain skin tumors–eg, the 2nd stages of KS, mycosis fungoides Neurology 'Shadow plaques' Multiple, irregularly shaped, and sharply demarcated lesions–focal demyelinization in the gray and white matter in the brain of Pts with MS. Asymmetric unit membrane plaque, Atherosclerotic plaque, Complicated plaque, Fibrous plaque, Multiple sclerosis, Parietal pleural plaque, Senile plaque, Shadow plaque, Soldier's plaque

plaque

(plak)
1. A patch or small, differentiated area on a body surface (e.g., skin, mucosa, or arterial endothelium) or on the cut surface of an organ such as the brain.
2. An area of clearing in a flat, confluent growth of bacteria or tissue cells.
3. A sharply defined zone of demyelination characteristic of multiple sclerosis.
[Fr. a plate]

plaque

1. An area of ATHEROMA found in the inner lining of arteries in the disease of ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
2. A sticky mixture of food debris, saliva and bacteria that persists around the necks of uncleaned teeth and is the main cause of tooth decay.

plaque

  1. a clear area in a ‘lawn’ of bacterial growth, in which the bacteria have undergone LYSIS due to BACTERIOPHAGE infection. The number of plaque-forming units in a given volume applied to the lawn can be used to calculate viral numbers in a suspension.
  2. a layer that forms on the surface of a tooth, composed of bacteria in an organic matrix (see BIOFILM). As the layer thickens, anaerobic respiration of the bacteria produces acids which dissolve the tooth enamel.

Plaque

Patches of scar tissue that form where the layer of yelin covering the nerve fibers is destroyed by the multiple sclerosis disease process.

plaque

, placque (plak)
2. Patch or small, differentiated area on body surface (e.g., skin, mucosa, or arterial endothelium) or on cut surface of an organ.
3. An area of clearing in a flat, confluent growth of bacteria or tissue cells.
[Fr. a plate]
References in periodicals archive ?
HSV-1 replication was evaluated by real-time PCR and viral plaque assays. We found that SLC15A3 protein displayed as a highly polymerized format when it was overexpressed (Figure 3(a)).
faecalis was observed with spot assay; however, in plaque assay no phage activity was observed.
Next, to assess the antiviral mechanism of action of ZSO against FCV-F9 and MNV-1, the antiviral effect of ZSO was examined at different time points during virus infection using plaque assay. Plaque assay can be used to target the multiplication cycle of the calicivirus attachment of the viral protein to the cellular receptor, internalization of virion into the cell, replication of the virus, and release of the mature virion from the cell [26].
P Johnson, "Enumeration of bacteriophages by double agar overlay plaque assay," Methods in Molecular Biology, vol.
The analysis by plaque assay was again in agreement with qRT-PCR (data not shown).
Moreover, the gelatin-based medium could be directly dissolved for further quantification by plaque assay and without the elution procedure.
YFV clinical isolate V-341 (provided by the Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto Nacional de Salud, Bogota) was amplified on Vero cells and titrated in a plaque assay. Briefly, 50 l of serial virus stock dilutions were added to Vero cells in 24-well plates (as previously indicated).
Nasal-wash samples obtained from 101 children prospectively enrolled during the RSV season between November 2004 and February 2005 were analyzed for viral pathogens via cell culture, RSV quantification via plaque assay, and cytokine and chemokine concentrations via the Bio-Plex Suspension Array System.
Aliquots were processed for standard plaque assay and DNA isolation (Qiagen QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit).
In the "proof of concept" clinical trial (also referred to as Small Plaque Assay or Microplaque Assay), 100 micronL of ATL1101 cream will be applied to areas of patients' skin, once every two days, over a one-month period.
A range of bacteriophage surrogates of mammalian viruses was employed (see Table 1) and efficacy was assessed by comparing the initial and final viral titres on the surfaces using a plaque assay technique.