pituitary apoplexy


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Related to pituitary apoplexy: Sheehan syndrome

pi·tu·i·tar·y ap·o·plex·y

a syndrome of abrupt onset, consisting of impaired consciousness, retroorbital pain, meningism, ophthalmoplegia, and rapidly progressive visual loss resulting from infarction of the pituitary gland, often because of a hemorrhage into a pituitary adenoma.

pituitary apoplexy

Acute life-threatening hemorrhagic infarction of the anterior pituitary or adenohypophysis, often associated with an infarcted pituitary adenoma or other tumor; PA may occur spontaneously, or due to an 'obstetric' hemorrhage–eg, Sheehan syndrome, regional RT, ↑ intracranial pressure, or systemic anticoagulation Clinical The PA 'syndrome' may be transient or permanent; it is characterized by sudden headache, loss of vision, ophthalmoplegia, and if severe, shock Lab ↓ Growth hormone, ↓ gonadotropins, ↓ ACTH, ↓ TSH–with hypothyroidism, abnormal prolactin secretion, rarely, diabetes insipidus Treatment Hormone replacement, bromocriptine

pituitary apoplexy

Hemorrhage into or necrosis of the pituitary gland. Symptoms may include sudden headache, oculomotor palsy, peripheral visual deficits, and altered mental status. Treatment usually includes prompt administration of adrenal steroids.
See also: apoplexy

pi·tu·i·tar·y ap·o·plex·y

(pi-tūi-tar-ē apŏ-plek-sē)
Syndrome of abrupt onset, consisting of impaired consciousness, retroorbital pain, meningism, ophthalmoplegia, and rapidly progressive visual loss resulting from infarction of pituitary gland.
References in periodicals archive ?
In light of the presence of fever, vomiting, headache and visual findings, it was thought that pituitary apoplexy and related adrenal failure developed and corticosteroid treatment was added.
Clinical features and surgical outcome of clinical and subclinical pituitary apoplexy.
Acute management of pituitary apoplexy surgery or conservative management.
Pituitary apoplexy occurs in approximately 1% of macro-adenomas; in 65 - 95% of cases, a pre-existing macro-adenoma is present.
Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome in which a pituitary adenoma undergoes sudden enlargement as a result of hemorrhage, infarction, or both.
MRI, by contrast, has demonstrated very high sensitivity for the detection of pituitary apoplexy, and can be used to confirm the diagnosis.
Classical pituitary apoplexy is a term describing an acute clinical syndrome, characterized by sudden onset of headache, vomiting, and visual and ocular disturbance; the incidence of pituitary apoplexy presenting with classical symptoms is approximately 3% in surgically treated pituitary adenomas (1,2).
1,10,13) This form of "autoparathyroidectomy" or "parathyroid apoplexy" results in hemorrhagic necrosis of the gland that is similar to processes seen in other endocrine gland neoplasms, namely pituitary apoplexy and adrenal adenoma.
Sheehan's syndrome is a well-known cause of panhypopituitarism, secondary to pituitary apoplexy.
In pituitary apoplexy syndrome (Figure 4), patients present with ophthalmoplegia, headache, and visual loss due to pituitary infarction/hemorrhage.
Use contrast-enhanced CT to identify arteriovenous malformation, subarachnoid hemorrhage, meningitis, hydrocephalus, neoplasm, pituitary apoplexy, stroke, or subdural hematoma.

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