piroplasmosis


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Related to piroplasmosis: anaplasmosis

ba·be·si·o·sis

(bă-bē'zē-ō'sis),
An infectious disease caused by a species of Babesia, transmitted by ticks. Animal hosts include cattle, sheep, deer, and dogs. Subclinical human infection may be common but symptomatic disease occurs only sporadically and in limited geographic distribution. Immunodeficient and asplenic people are at higher risk of infection. Clinical features of the disease include fever, chills, and hemolysis with hemoglobinuria and jaundice. Severe disease may be complicated by cardiac and renal failure, respiratory distress syndrome, and CNS involvement. As in animals, human morbidity and mortality increase with age.
Synonym(s): piroplasmosis
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

piroplasmosis

(pĭr′ə-plăz-mō′sĭs)
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Very few camel piroplasmosis reports are available recently in the one-humped camel zone, such as Egypt [5], Iraq [6], and Iran [7].
equi has been diagnosed in asymptomatic horses with no known natural exposure to the ticks which indicate that carrier animals may act as reservoirs to prove equine piroplasmosis in some areas where tick vectors may be present Moreover intrauterine Infection of foals with B.
Key words: Equine Piroplasmosis, Babesiosis, Theileria equi, Babesia caballi, Pentamidine, Imidocarb, Diminazene.
The 19 common of the total 53 diseases/conditions in horses and donkeys were: ankylosis, conjunctivitis, diarrhea, foot puncture, heat stress, impactive colic, indigestion, insect/pesticide toxicity, mange, phosphorus deficiency, piroplasmosis, quidding, sprain fetlock, sprain shoulder, strangles, uveitis, S.
Among the 40 blood samples (suspicion of piroplasmosis), we confirmed the presence of Babesia canis in 12 samples by microscopic examination of blood smears (Giemsa staining), an overall prevalence of 30%.
Theileria equi (incertae sedis; Piroplasma equi Laveran, 1901) is one of the etiologic agents of equine piroplasmosis. This parasite infects equids worldwide, but a few countries (Australia, Great Britain, Japan, United States, and Canada) are classified as free of this disease.
Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is a tickborne disease of horses that has been largely absent from the United States for decades, thanks to cooperative federal and state efforts at eradication.
IRELAND'S department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food has confirmed that a number of thoroughbred horses in an unnamed equine facility in County Meath have been found to be suffering from equine piroplasmosis, writes Martin Stevens.
Equine piroplasmosis, or equine babesiasis, is a protozoan disease occurring in horses, mules, and donkeys in the southeastern part of the United States, particularly Florida and Georgia.