piriformis muscle


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Related to piriformis muscle: Piriformis syndrome, Psoas muscle

pi·ri·for·mis mus·cle

(pir'i-fōrm'is mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, margins of pelvic sacral foramina and greater sciatic notch of ilium; insertion, upper border of greater trochanter; action, rotates thigh laterally; nerve supply, nerve to piriformis (sciatic plexus).
Synonym(s): musculus piriformis [TA] , piriform muscle.

piriformis muscle

Thigh muscle. Origin: anterior surface of sacrum. Insertion: upper part of greater trochanter of femur. Nerve: spinal L5-S2. Action: laterally rotates thigh.
See also: muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
A case of Piriformis syndrome is presented in the neurology clinic with similar complaints secondary to abnormal course of sciatic nerve through cleaved fibres of piriformis muscle.
If you don't get better, your doctor may need to find out whether your problem comes from a herniated disk, an inflamed piriformis muscle, or other causes.
The man underwent an MRI scan focusing on his hips, with particular emphasis on the path of the right sciatic nerve in the right gluteal area and around the piriformis muscle.
Her lower abdominal CT scan revealed an image consistent with that of a hydatid cyst with cystic and solid components measuring 67x45 mm adjacent to the anterior side of the left piriformis muscle and with its distinct interface between the uterus-ovary and neighboring rectus.
She later developed sacral bone, sacroiliac joint and piriformis muscle involvement.
INTRODUCTION: Piriformis syndrome is a painful musculoskeletal condition resembling sciatica, secondary to sciatic nerve entrapment in piriformis muscle at the greater sciatic notch.
A germane link between piriformis muscle atrophy and lumbar disc herniation.
Compression of the sciatic nerve by the piriformis muscle may lead to hip and buttock pain, hamstring muscle tightness, and lower extremity weakness and pain.
My hip turned black and blue and my orthopedic doctor diagnosed a now torn piriformis muscle.
The PN arises from the S2-S4 roots of the sacral plexus, exiting the pelvis under the piriformis muscle through the greater sciatic foramen and descending ventral to the sacrotuberous ligament.
8) In our case, CT was a useful tool to make the diagnosis, to assess the extent of the soft tissue infection and to ascertain the infectious source by exhibiting the intrapelvic extension of inflammatory changes via the piriformis muscle.