pinworm


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oxyurid

 [ok″se-u´rid]
an individual organism of the superfamily Oxyuroidea; called also pinworm.

pin·worm

(pin'wŏrm),
A member of the genus Enterobius or related genera of nematodes in the family Oxyuridae, abundant in a large variety of vertebrates, including such species as Oxyuris equi (the horse pinworm), Enterobius vermicularis (the human pinworm), Syphacia and Aspiculuris species (the mouse pinworm), Passalurus ambiguus (the rabbit pinworm), and Syphacia muris (the rat pinworm).
Synonym(s): seatworm

pinworm

(pĭn′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various small nematode worms of the order Oxyurida that are parasitic in vertebrates and certain invertebrates, especially Enterobius vermicularis, a species that infests the human intestines. Also called threadworm.

pinworm

Enterobius vermicularis, seatworm; threadworm Microbiology
A small–visible to the naked eye—whitish worm found in North America; adult pinworms live in the colon, laying eggs outside the anus during the night and spread directly from contaminated clothing, articles, hands, or indirectly by aerosol, from which the eggs are inhaled or swallowed; eggs hatch in the small intestine and travel to the colon where they mature

pin·worm

(pin'wŏrm)
A member of the genus Enterobius or related nematodes causing intestinal parasitism in a large variety of vertebrates, including humans (Enterobius vermicularis, the human pinworm).
Synonym(s): seatworm.

Pinworm

Enterobius vermicularis, a nematode worm of the family Oxyuridae that causes parasitic infestation of the intestines and cecum. Pinworm is endemic in both temperate and tropical regions and common especially in school age children.
Mentioned in: Antihelminthic Drugs
References in periodicals archive ?
The key ingredient in Reese's Pinworm Medicine is pyrantel pamoate, which is the only anthelmintic drug that has been approved for O-T-C sales by the Food and Drug Administration.
The same scale used in the characterization of South American tomato pinworm injuries was used for the damage caused by the leaf miner in the leaf, and the walking done by the insect on the leaves allowed to quantify the percentage of attack.
Groner et al., "Clinical manifestations of appendiceal pinworms in children: an institutional experience and a review of the literature," Pediatric Surgery International, vol.
Enterobius vermicularis infections, though uncommon in normally sterile upper genital tract of females, are rare but cause significant morbidity.7,9-11 Since ectopic infections with pinworms are relatively uncommon, the clinical suspicion is also low in cases where patient presents with signs and symptoms of a tubo-ovarian abscess or pelvic inflammatory disease.
The company said EMVERM is indicated for the treatment of Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm), Trichuris trichiura (whipworm), Ascaris lumbricoides (common roundworm), Ancylostoma duodenale (common hookworm), Necator americanus (American hookworm) in single or mixed infections.
Pinworm infection produces no symptoms aside from itching in and around the anal area and disturbed sleep, and, in girls, vaginal itching and irritation.
Only carriage of parasites other than pinworm, Ancylostoma, and Ascaris was significantly higher in the control schools (P = 0.03).
Parasites of the potato tuberworm, tomato pinworm, and other, closely related gelechiids.
(1-3) It has been documented that Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) infections of the gastrointestinal tract occur in 4-28% of children worldwide, with a high prevalence in developing and tropical countries.