uterodomes

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uterodomes

Large, rounded, smooth projections of the apical plasma membrane, which have been identified in the uterine epithelium of many species during early pregnancy, from rodents to humans. In humans, these structures are seen during the receptive phase for blastocyst implantation, and are important indicators of normal endocrine progression and of uterine receptivity for blastocyst implantation. While their function is unknown, uterodomes represent a transformation of a microvillous plasma membrane into a smooth and flattened plasma membrane during early gestation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the protein marker of endometrial receptivity, we also observed the pinopodes, which are smooth mushroom-like projections that arise from the apical surface of the endometrium and are considered as endometrial receptivity marker [38].
Loutradus et al., "Implantation: uterine pinopodes as markers of the 'nidation window' in cycling women receiving exogenous oestradiol and progesterone," Human Reproduction, vol.
Pinopodes on luminal epithelium were confluent; glands secretion and stromal edema were well developed during WOI (b) compared to the prereceptive phase (a).
We hypothesize that the endometrial receptivity was significantly reduced after COH [25] and that pinopodes emerge prematurely, leading to early opening of the implant window [26].
Bentin-Ley, "Relevance of endometrial pinopodes for human blastocyst implantation," Human Reproduction (Oxford, England), vol.
Pinopodes, coming with the loss of microvilli on the surface of endometrial epithelium, are large, rounded, and smooth-surfaced projections of the apical plasma membrane.
We found a significant disappearance of the pinopodes on the surface of the mice endometrial epithelium after exposure to X-irradiation.
Presence of uterine pinopodes at the embryo- endometrial interface during human implantation in vitro.
In mice lacking of LIF, absence of pinopodes was observed [44].
The endometrial epithelium has a highly specific appearance: Microvilli, which are present after ovulation, disappear six days after ovulation; the cells are then covered with pyramidal protrusions called pinopodes, which disappear, in turn, nine days after ovulation.
Immunohistochemical assay, real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, TUNEL method, biomarkers associated with endometrial receptivity such as endometrial thickness, angiogenesis, and pinopodes by microscopic examination were measured by microsocpic exam.